Cody Newill | KCUR

Cody Newill

Digital Editor

Born and raised in Independence, Mo., Cody is passionate about the Kansas City metro and its culture. A graduate of the University of Missouri-Kansas City, Cody has contributed to arts and culture publications such as The Bohemian Zine and completed an internship with KCUR's "Up to Date." He currently works as the digital editor for the station, producing web and social media content. 

Ways to Connect

During his presidency, Warren G. Harding was generally well liked among Americans. In contemporary times however, Harding's cronyism and corruption have sent him to the bottom of favorite president lists.

On Thursday's Up to Date, we talk with historian Phillip Payne about Harding's upbringing, his ascendancy to power, and the scandals that still plague his image to this day.

A 20-Year View For MoDOT

Nov 20, 2013
modot_stl_photos/Flickr-CC

The Missouri Department of Transportation just released its 20-year plan for the state’s roads and bridges. MoDOT expects it will have about $17 billion dollars to pay for the plan. However, if it completed all the maintenance and construction suggested by Missouri citizens in a recent survey, it would need a budget of $70 billion. 

On Wednesday's Up to Date, we talk about the plan and how the state will prioritize its future projects.

Guest:

Protests and legal challenges are common when you’re the regional head of the prominent family planning organization, Planned Parenthood.

In the first part of Monday's Up to Date, we sit down with Peter Brownlie, the retiring president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri. Brownlie discusses his legal battles with former Kansas Attorney General and District Attorney Phill Kline, protests, and why he wore a bulletproof vest to work.

Guest:

Fox Searchlight Pictures

Looking for a great film to see the weekend of November 8-10? Up to Date's indie, documentary and foreign film critics share their three favorites showing on area screens.

Cynthia Haines:

  • Wadjda
  • 12 Years a Slave
  • All is Lost

Steve Walker

Finding A Fairly-Priced Funeral

Oct 30, 2013
mikecollar/Flickr-CC

Planning a funeral can be one of the most personal and vulnerable times for any family, but that doesn’t stop funeral homes from trying to up-sell grieving friends and family on gold rimmed caskets and other additional merchandise.

On Thursday's Up to Date, we talk with Josh Slocum, executive director of Funeral Consumers Alliance, who believes consumers are getting stiffed when it comes to laying themselves or loved ones to rest. We also discuss why green burial is making a comeback.

stockmonkeys.com

Not many retail companies can or want to boast that their employees are paid $21 an hour and given health insurance, but Costco is proud to do so. 

On Monday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with founder and former Costco CEO Jim Sinegal about the wild success and the almost unparalleled employee compensation that his company is known for. We'll find out why Sinegal decided to pay his workers over twice the national minimum wage, and what effects it has on their work ethic and shareholders' blood pressure.

Guests:

henrybushkin.com

With Jimmy Fallon due to take over "The Tonight Show" in early 2014, many are looking back to the days when Johnny Carson hosted the late night show.

On Monday's Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Carson's former lawyer, Henry Bushkin about his new behind-the-scenes memoir detailing his relationship with the longest running "Tonight Show" host. From their initial meeting in 1970 to their falling out in 1988, Carson trusted Bushkin as his legal advisor, tennis partner, and close friend. 

Guests:

worstgig.com

It's hard to imagine Def Leppard, John Mayer, or any other rock musician having a bad day, but Jon Niccum​ begs to differ. 

1913: Before The Great War

Oct 20, 2013

By 1919, much of continental Europe lay in ruins in the aftermath of World War I. Prior to that conflict, with three European empires ruled by the “Kingly cousins,” most people thought a war was nearly impossible.

Grandmothers Against Gun Violence/Facebook

In the wake of the Sandy Hook Elementary School and Washington Navy Yard shootings, many find themselves questioning the use of guns in society. 

On Wednesday's Up to Date, we talk with a Cape Cod grandma who wants to change the dialogue on gun violence in this country. She joins Steve Kraske to discuss her plan to encourage accountability and responsibility while finding common ground with gun owners. 

Guests:

Way back in 1981 when Ronald Reagan was president, politics simply worked, or at least that’s what Chris Matthews says.

On Tuesday's Up to Date, we talk with Matthews about his new book, Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked, which chronicles the bipartisan efforts of President Reagan and then Speaker of the House Tip O’Neil to raise the debt ceiling and pass other important legislation back in 1981, and why Congress just can’t seem to do the same now.

Guest:

Should lawmakers withhold funding from the University of Kansas if the school doesn’t fire a professor over a highly controversial tweet? Professor David Guth blasted the National Rifle Association on Twitter in the wake of the Navy Yard shooting on Twitter, and now many are calling for accountability.

In the first part of Tuesday's Up to Date, we discuss just how far employers can go when their employees make charged statements on social media.  

  Guests:

Fixing Fiscal Policy

Sep 24, 2013
David Iliff/Wikimedia Commons

With the House of Representatives and the president once again butting heads over the federal budget, a government shutdown is looking more likely by the day.

On Tuesday's Up to Date, Bob Bixby of the Concord Coalition joins Steve Kraske to talk about the economy, the effect a shutdown could have on the country if Congress doesn’t pass a new budget and how the debt ceiling debate figures into the equation.

Guest:

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