Cody Newill | KCUR

Cody Newill

Audience Development Specialist

Cody Newill was born and raised in Independence, Missouri, where he learned to love (and later despise) tallboys of Bud Light and American rock band Green Day. Somehow, he managed to parlay that dubious beginning into a college degree from the University of Missouri-Kansas City. And, somehow, he managed to turn that into a job at KCUR. Now, he listens to better music and drinks craft beer.

Cody won a Regional Edward R. Murrow award for his work curating kcur.org in 2017. But his true accomplishments lie in his reporting on arcade bars in Kansas City, Twitter memes and using the term "Devil's lettuce" in a story. Cody spends a truly absurd amount of time playing video games, but it's for a good cause! He co-hosts a podcast, What's In a Game, with his partner, Dana, who is the best partner in the world.  Once rolled two natural 20s on two d20s while playing Dungeons & Dragons. That's a 1/400 chance, y'all. 

Ways to Connect

KCUR 89.3 / StoryCorps

KCUR is part of StoryCorps' One Small Step initiative to bring together people of differing political opinions for real conversations. This is one we've chosen to highlight.

Kevin McEvoy, who describes himself as "very conservative," wants to make sure his children grow up without prejudice against people of color. But he's admittedly unsure about how best to guide them.

KCUR 89.3 / StoryCorps

KCUR is part of StoryCorps' One Small Step initiative to bring together people of differing political opinions for real conversations. This is one we've chosen to highlight.

Ph.D. candidate Erica Stone doesn't talk about politics with her family much anymore. And when she does, it usually turns south fast.

Matthew Long-Middleton / KCUR 89.3 / StoryCorps

KCUR is part of StoryCorps' One Small Step initiative to bring together people of differing political opinions for real conversations. This is one we've chosen to highlight.

Teacher Brittney Fiedler says being from Kansas carries some baggage when you talk to people in other states.

"They assume you're from a farm, they assume you see tornadoes all the time and they assume you're a pretty conservative person," Fiedler says. "For me, none of those things are true, really."

Seg. 1: Housing Study | Seg. 2: Sign Language

Jun 27, 2019

Segment 1: National perspective on affordable housing in Kansas City.

As new households form, additional housing stock isn't keeping pace, studies show. Meanwhile, rent is rising faster than inflation. It's a nationwide problem, but people are really feeling it in Kansas City.

  • Chris Herbert, managing director, Harvard Joint Centers For Housing Studies

Segment 2: American Sign Language finally counts as a major at the University of Kansas. 

Mike Russo / KCUR 89.3

Quinton Lucas has tried to position himself as the progressive candidate for Kansas City, Missouri mayor, taking bold stances on tax incentives and criminal justice reform.

To get a better look at Lucas on a more personal level, KCUR's Lisa Rodriguez went to Ward Parkway Lanes with the mayoral hopeful to talk about spending time in Hutchinson, Kansas, his (rusty) Spanish and more. Take a look here:

Mike Russo / KCUR 89.3

Jolie Justus has built her mayoral campaign around pragmatism and the idea that Kansas City needs a mayor to focus on issues like affordable housing and crime — and focus on growing the city's profile on the national stage. 

And, as it turns out, she's also pretty darn good at throwing axes.

KCUR's Lisa Rodriguez went to Blade and Timber with Justus to chat about her time in the Missouri General Assembly, her four rescue dogs and a whole lot more.  Take a look here:

StoryCorps / KCUR 89.3

KCUR is part of StoryCorps' One Small Step initiative to bring together people of differing political opinions for real conversations. This is one we've chosen to highlight.

Joanna Berkebile and Stacey Todd have lived very different lives. Berkebile intentionally set down roots in Kansas City, working as a realtor. She's also active in the city's arts scene and has found a strong sense of community there.

"I'm not super politically active, but I'm active in my community," Berkebile saidto Todd. "[But I'm] not afraid to speak my mind wherever I am. That has ripples and reverberations around me."

Catalin Abagiu / StoryCorps

It was days after the 2016 election when Joseph Weidknecht, a Trump supporter sporting a sign that read “Proud to Be Deplorable” and a “Make America Great Again” cap showed up at a march protesting the election of Donald Trump in Austin, Texas.

Amina Amdeen, a Muslim student at the University of Texas, was one of the marchers who came to the peaceful rally that day before part of the protest broke into violence.

StoryCorps

KCUR has been selected, along with five other public radio stations, to participate in StoryCorps' One Small Step Communities initiative to foster civil conversations between Kansas Citians on opposite ends of political issues. 

KCUR Director of Community Engagement Ron Jones says the project is a natural fit for Kansas City.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Matt and Abby Anderson had only been dating a few months when the accident happened. Abby was just 18 when she lost control of her car on the way to school and slammed into a semi.

"When you woke up and gained consciousness, what was your first concern?" Matt asked her.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

When Deany and Corbin Goode got a chance to sit down at the StoryCorps Mobile Tour in Kansas City, Corbin got down to business with his questions — and some of them were tough.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Stephanie Nowotarski is a lot of things at once. She's a postdoctoral scientist working on electron microscopy at the Stowers Institute in Kansas City. She's an artist working in a wide variety of media. 

She also experiences auditory-tactile synesthesia — When she hears some sounds or music, she sometimes also experiences them as touches.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

John Mendoza graduated from Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas, in 1967, excited to take on a job at NASA as an aerospace engineer. 

"I always wanted to be a figher pilot because of movies and space programs, outer space movies," John told his daughter, Valerie M. Mendoza.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Joseph and Elaine Chow first met as teenagers in the 1950s. In those days, it was rare for any young adult to have a car. So the fact that Joseph had one immediately stood out.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Samantha Ruggles came out as a transgender woman long after her grandparents and parents had passed away.

"If they were still alive, how would that conversation have gone? Your coming out?" her friend Darin Challacombe asked.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Note: This post contains racial slurs and descriptions of violence. 

Rebecca Liberty and Necia Gamby call themselves "sister friends" because their bond is so tight. But the women came from very different environments growing up.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

"What was it like being the only woman in most of your classes?" Michelle Bertuglia-Haley asked her mother, Lynn Bertuglia.

In the 1970s, it was uncommon for engineering programs in U.S. colleges to accept women. But the University of Kansas did, so Bertuglia decided to give it a shot.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Chris and Gina Moore have spent almost five years trying to conceive a child.

"I have so much control in our everyday lives, like how we take care of the house or how we take care of our dog," Gina said. "But everything to do with fertility or trying to conceive I had absolutely no control of."

KCUR's website is undergoing maintenance from Friday, 8 p.m. through Sunday. Many features may be down during that time:

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

For muralists Phil Shafer, aka Sike Style, and JT Daniels, making bold, colorful murals throughout Kansas City is more than just painting outdoors.

StoryCorps

Mariana Hildreth felt like she had done everything right when she decided to come to the United States from Mexico: She had a degree, years of professional experience and worked through legal channels to get a work permit.

She felt privileged.

"'I'm just going to conquer the world, I'm going to move there and I'm going to make it work,'" Hildreth thought before she moved. "But when I came here, nothing that I thought I was mattered."

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Ashley Raines' childhood wasn't easy.

"I wouldn't classify it as entirely ugly or unfortunate or anything, but it was a struggle," Raines told his wife Vanessa Aricco.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth is in Kansas City until September to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Alex Martinez and Miguel Morales may be more than 20 years apart in age, but their experiences in the United States as Latinx children speak to the unique challenges they have faced here.

KCUR 89.3 has hired reporter Christopher Haxel as a member of the inaugural cohort of Audion Fellows, who will spend two years reporting on the role of guns in American life as part of a new national “Guns & America” reporting collaborative.

All 10 fellows will work in public media newsrooms across the country. 

StoryCorps

The StoryCorps MobileBooth came to Kansas City this summer to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Sada K. Jackson's mother, Ileana Watson, passed away in 2016 after battling breast cancer. So when Jackson got a chance to record at the StoryCorps MobileBooth, she chose to sit down with her mother's good friend Angela Morehead-Mugita.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth is in Kansas City until September to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Joel Barrett and David Seymour first met because of a scarf.

"I remember your scarf," Barrett said. "It was a very colorful striped scarf, and I used that as my entry point to have a conversation with you."

Barrett and Seymour came from very different backgrounds, particularly when it came to religion.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth is in Kansas City until September to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Today, Kansas City's Leeds neighborhood is an industrial area near the Truman Sports Complex. But back in the 1940s and '50s, it was a self-contained black community.

"Leeds was a place where people from the deep south come up to live with their relatives to start a new life," said Earline Bentley, who grew up in Leeds with her sister Cheryl Looney.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth is in Kansas City until September to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Facing the end of life often brings hard choices. Diane Botwin decided to have her father, Dr. A. E. Botwin, move in with her family 20 years ago when his health began to fade.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

KCUR was named "Radio Station of the Year" by the Kansas City Press Club's Heart of America Awards and took home nine Gold Awards for breaking news, investigative reporting and more. The station also received two first place awards from Public Radio News Directors Incorporated, or PRNDI. 

The Kansas City Press Club honors journalists from western Missouri and eastern Kansas each year. KCUR received nine Gold Awards, nine Silver Awards, three Bronze Awards and several honorable mentions. 

Amanda Meltzer / StoryCorps

Every Friday during Morning Edition on KCUR 89.3, listeners get to hear intimate conversations between everyday people through StoryCorps — and soon Kansas Citians will get a chance to tell their own stories when the StoryCorps MobileBooth Airstream comes into town this summer.

At KCUR's RadioActive Friday, StoryCorps founder Dave Isay formally announced the MobileBooth tour stop.

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