Suzanne Hogan | KCUR

Suzanne Hogan

Announcer/Producer/Reporter

Suzanne Hogan graduated from the College of Santa Fe in New Mexico, with degrees in Political Science and Documentary Studies. Her interests include Latin American politics, immigration and storytelling in a variety of mediums including photography, film/video and writing. 

After college, Suzanne moved back to her hometown, Kansas City and was the Producer for The Walt Bodine Show for about two years. Now she serves as a part-time announcer, producer, and contributing reporter, filling in around the station wherever she can. Suzanne is also a founding member of the 816 Bicycle Collective, a recycle a bicycle program in Kansas City.

In her spare time, Suzanne  plays bass in a punk rock band, enjoys spontaneous traveling, and riding her bicycle all around town.

Ways to Connect

Segment 1: Local lawyer finds a niche in space law

Space is an exciting new frontier, challenging humanity to advance in math, science, and engineering. But what about law? We hear from a Kansas City lawyer who has made a name for himself in dealing with the ownership of objects originating from space.

  • Chris McHugh, lawyer

Segment 2, beginning at 15:35: Mark Twain's love letter to American cuisine

Segment 1: How to run.

It's finally spring and that means sunshine, flowers and people jogging outside. We visit with a local coach to find out how to get "in the zone" about running.

Segment 2, beginning at 12:40: How floods shaped Kansas City.

Segment 1: Are you using your phone to read this? Us too.

A cell phone today is basically just as important as our wallet and keys; we do not want to leave the house without it. But is this reliance actually an addiction? We talk with parents and smartphone users about why phones are so addictive and how they are affecting our moods, motivations, and parenting.

Segment 1: The debate over free pre-kindergarten. 

At face value, the idea of universal preschool sounds great. And that's exactly what Kansas City Mayor Sly James is trying to accomplish with his proposal calling for a sales tax to fund it. But he's facing quite a bit of opposition, notably from the local school districts. Mayor James joins us to lay out his plan, and then school superintendent Dan Clemens explains his concerns with the proposal.

Seg. 1: Snow Days. Seg. 2: Passion For Deaning.

Jan 15, 2019

Segment 1: Fallout from a snowstorm. 

From a missing snow-person to more serious issues like coping with school closures from one district to another, Kansas Citians have stories about this crazy snowfall. Plus, KCP&L explains why some people's power comes on faster than others after widespread outages.

Segment 1: Local lawyer finds a niche in space law.

Space is an exciting new frontier challenging humanity to advance in math, science, and engineering. But what is it mean for advances in the law. Who owns space? We hear from a Kansas City lawyer who has made a name for himself in dealing with the ownership of objects originating from space.

  • Chris McHugh, lawyer

Segment 2, beginning at 15:25: Instagram stars of Kansas City.

Segment 1: Mark Twain's love letter to American cuisine.

Samuel Clemens, AKA Mark Twain, was an avid writer and traveler. He was also a champion of America's regional foods. While homesick in Europe, he wrote an extensive list of the foods he missed, like prairie hen and peach cobbler. On this episode, we speak with the author who's been following in Twain's culinary footsteps, first for a book in 2011, and now for a podcast.

Amado Espinoza

Hosted by Gina Kaufmann, KCUR's Central Standard explored more than 500 topics and invited more than 700 people to share their expertise and stories on the daily talk show in 2018.

With so many conversations, there's no way to convey the breadth and depth of topics we covered. But in the spirit of year-end reflection, we decided to highlight some of our favorite dicsussions.

Segment 1: Comedy is comedy for kids and adults.

Mo Willems has written for Sesame Street and has authored many children's books with iconic characters such as Pigeon and Knuffle Bunny. We talk with him about the many emotions and lessons depicted in his books. His most recent exhibit, The Pigeon Comes to Topeka!, is on display until January 4th.

Segment 1: Jabari Asim on race in America.

"We Can't Breathe" is a collection of essays exploring how the legacy of racism fits into the stories we tell about our past. On this episode, author and St. Louis native Jabari Asim discusses storytelling in his St. Louis neighborhood, the complexity of the founding fathers, and why racism doesn't surprise him.

For some, genetic testing can provide answers to lifelong questions. But DNA also raises unique ethical conundrums when it comes to privacy and discrimination. On this episode, we dive into the personal stories and moral curiosities about DNA.

Guests:

Segment 1: Kansas City poet wins International Latino Book Award

A local poet has won two major awards this year, for her work in both English and Spanish. On this episode, we speak with Xánath Caraza about poetry as a way to break silence, the best way to produce a lot of art, and the women that have had significant influence on her life. 

The National World War I Museum and Memorial

Of the 40 million people who died in World War I, only 441 were from around Kansas City. With so few casualties from this area, how did the national museum and memorial for this war end up here?

Mike Vietti, the museum's marketing director, hears this question a lot.

"This really was, in many respects, a crowdsourced National Museum and Memorial," Vietti says.

To understand why Kansas City was up to that challenge requires remembering what the city was like a hundred years ago.

1918 in Kansas City

Segment 1: How to remember war.

How World War 1 was a pivotal moment in how we memorialize wars, with Kansas City's Liberty Memorial playing a key role.

Segment 1: A Kansas City musician's self-proclaimed 'nerdy rap.'

Kadesh Flow is a trombonist with The Phantastics. He released "Room Service," a solo hip-hop album, which he recorded in a hotel room during a gamer convention. Hear more of his story, from leaving his job at Cerner to pursue music to being part of the Nerdy People of Color Collective.

In her new album, "Dirty Computer," Janelle Monáe reveals more of herself than ever before. And, in recent weeks, she has been sharing more of her story, from her background in Kansas City, Kansas, to her sexuality. A look at the music, life and persona of Janelle Monáe ... and what her story means to Kansas Citians.

Segment 1: It's never too late to travel back home, even when you're 90 years old.

We visit with a Kansas City filmmaker and actress about a locally-made movie exploring themes of aging, memories and wanderlust.

Bob Jones Shoes has been a staple in downtown Kansas City since 1960. When the retailer announced it was closing its doors in August, many shoe aficionados in Kansas City were aghast.

They've flocked to the final days of the footwear mecca to find that last perfect "fit," take advantage of the going-out-of-business sale and pay their respects to what has become a local icon.

Monarch Butterflies

Sep 24, 2018

It's that time of year when monarch butterflies emerge from cocoons in our area to join the butterflies migrating south to Mexico. On this episode, we learn what's at stake for monarch butterflies and the environment. Plus, we learn how to create a monarch waystation

  • Orley "Chip" Taylor, founder and director, Monarch Watch

Is there a correlation between the way we relate to objects and the way we treat our relationships with people? A KU researcher has found that when we treat everything else as expendable … we may unwittingly treat human beings that way, too.

Guests:

  • Omri Gillath, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology at KU
  • Kelly Ludwig, folk art collector and author of Detour Art

Courtesy of Cris Medina

With professional teams like Sporting KC and the Kansas City Comets, soccer is clearly a popular sport in Kansas City. And there are tons of recreational leagues for adults and kids. But that was not always the case.

Landon Vonderschmidt

Editor's note: StoryCorps OutLoud visited KCUR in the summer of 2015 to collect stories from Kansas City's LGBTQ community in partnership with the Gay and Lesbian Archive of Mid-America. This story originally aired in August 2015. Since then, Bernard Shondell and Brigid Burgett both say they remain good friends. StoryCorps is once again in Kansas City, and KCUR will begin airing new stories recorded here starting Monday, August 20, 2018.

Bernard Shondell and Ann Marie Pikus were best friends in high school. After college they were inseparable and decided to get married. They were married for 10 years and had three kids, then 14 years ago Ann Marie died of cancer. It was after her death, during a car ride with his three-year-old niece that Shondell had a profound realization about his sexuality.

“It was Christmas after Ann had passed away,” recalls Shondell. “And as we were driving around Colleen just blurts out, ‘When are you going to get a new mommy for Joey?’ That really kept me up.”

The several waterways that weave through Kansas City make a big impact on shaping The Metro. Especially after heavy rains. On this episode, we learn how flooding shaped our city.

Guests:

Segment 1: Remembering a Kansas artist who made furniture as he made sculptures.

Wendell Castle revolutionized art. The Holton, Kansas, native was known as the father of the studio furniture movement of the 1960s and 1970s. Hear his story and what he meant to the art world.

Segment 1: New voters are projected to make a huge impact on the upcoming midterm elections. 

First time voters are less likely to affiliate with a political party, which makes them an attractive demographic for politicians from either side of the aisle. We find out how this offset of voters can impact the upcoming midterm election and what issues new voters are interested in. 

As school winds down, one question always comes to most people's minds: what did you do this summer? On today's show, we speak with students and teachers who spent their summer doing surprising things like helping clean water efforts in South Africa or creating a campaign strategy. Oh, and winning "Jeopardy!"

  • Luciana De Anda, student, Olathe East High School
  • John Kevern, professor, UMKC School of Computing and Engineering
  • Larry Martin, teacher, Belinder Elementary

UpdateSince this recording aired on November 22, 2010, Susan Wilson has become the Vice-chancellor of Diversity and Inclusion at UMKC. She also shares that she reached out to her Italian side of her family that had disowned her mother. She received an email back saying: “Susan, this is your cousin John. I have been looking for you for over 25 years.” Susan Wilson and Sharmelle Winsett attended their first Italian family reunion in 2015.

Adib Khorram

Jul 26, 2018

Kansas City author Adib Khorram talks about his new buzz-generating novel for young adults, Darius The Great Is Not Okay. It turns out, Khorram has a lot in common with his teenage protagonist, from growing up half-Iranian in the United States to navigating life with depression to being obsessed with Star Trek and hot tea.

  • Adib Khorram, author, Darius The Great Is Not Okay

Medical tourism is a multi-billion dollar industry. It's where countries or cities become known for a certain kind of medical procedure and attract patients as visitors. And with these visitors comes money. Are local health institutions trying to push Kansas City as THE place to be if you need a liver transplant? And is this practice ethically problematic?

Guests:

Segment 1: Tomato season is upon us. Here's everything you need to know.

James Worley blogs about growing and eating tomatoes in Kansas City. He also organizes the annual "totally tomato weekend." Hear his growing tips and favorite recipes as he makes the case that all local menus should revolve around tomatoes right now.

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