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Segment 1: New voters are projected to make a huge impact on the upcoming midterm elections. 

First time voters are less likely to affiliate with a political party, which makes them an attractive demographic for politicians from either side of the aisle. We find out how this offset of voters can impact the upcoming midterm election and what issues new voters are interested in. 

Across America, gentrification is pricing people out of the communities they grew up in. Today, we look at alternatives to avoid raising the cost of living in existing neighborhoods.

Then, we learn how Jamie Sanders, the lead actor in the KC Rep's latest play about a young boy with autism, forged a connection with his character through his own experience with Tourette syndrome. 

Guests:

Mike Mozart / Flickr-CC

Today, we meet two high school students from Kansas City's Central Academy of Excellence who are using art to tell stories about gun violence. 

Plus, find out how communities, both rural and urban, are affected by the expansion of dollar stores such as Dollar General.

Guests:

Future Atlas / Flickr-CC

According to a recent report from the Census Bureau, more millennials are moving out of the inner city and into the suburbs. But are they leaving because they actually want to? Today, a discussion on the reasons why young adults are moving out of the urban core and how their generation may change the future of suburbia.

Guests:

Tory Garcia / Courtesy of Kemet Coleman

The Phantastics describe themselves as “dance floor activators.”

For the last six years, they’ve been activating local dance floors with songs that meld rap, jazz, gospel, funk and more.

“We definitely try to incorporate as many genres as possible to create not chaos, but a winding river of music,” rapper Kemet Coleman told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR’s Central Standard.

Empty Houses

Aug 31, 2017
Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

In Kansas City, there are so many vacant properties that the city tried to sell some of them for a dollar. We take a look at the stories of abandoned homes — why are they empty and how do they affect communities, both urban and rural?

Guests:

In a new Netflix series, a family flees from Chicago and goes into hiding at the Lake of the Ozarks. We take a closer look at Ozark and how the show represents Missouri — and the larger urban-rural divide in the Midwest.

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We take a look at the challenges of bringing quality healthcare to people in urban and rural communities, from a KCK clinic that serves the homeless to a program in a remote county that sends case workers to see patients.

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It's almost impossible to pass through Kansas City's suburbs without seeing an office park. They're so commonplace, we almost don't notice them. But, they're a big part of our suburban cityscape, and someone put them there on purpose. So who did this and why?

Plus, in the 1940s, a Kansas man made one small town into his scientific laboratory. How Roger Barker founded environmental psychology.

Guests:

Jalisco Campus Party / Flickr - CC

Are all those April showers making your May flowers feel a little soggy? Today, we get tips for late-spring gardening from the Kansas City Community Gardens. Also, we speak with Kevin Mitnick about how hackers can use digital know-how and social engineering to work their way into your computer. Mitnick gave up hacking after a five-year stint in prison for computer-related crimes. Now he helps companies and governments secure their own digital networks.

Over the past 20 years, Kansas City has invested over $100 million in the East Side, but private development has been slower to follow. What would it take to get more people investing their dollars and their energy in KC's urban core?

Guests:

Water is life — you drink it, cook with it and even shower in it — but unregulated runoff from farms and business can pose a threat to keeping it clean. A new series from Harvest Public Media, based at KCUR, looks at the conditions of water in Kansas City and throughout the Midwest.

Guests:

Matt Hodapp / KCUR

Missouri Sen. Ryan Silvey (R-Kansas City) provides an insider perspective on the Missouri General Assembly as we discuss the urban versus rural divide and transportation.

This is an excerpt from Statehouse Blend. You can listen to the full episode here, or by subscribing on iTunes.

Guests:

  • Ryan Silvey, Representative from Kansas City, Missouri General Assembly 
  • Matt StaubBlogger
  • Elle Moxley, General Assignment Reporter, KCUR

Kansas City-area students who transfer during the school year face daunting challenges. Student mobility interrupts a child's education and presents teachers with the task of catching pupils up with the rest of the class.

Guests:

  • Dr. Leigh Anne Taylor Knight is the Executive Director of the Kansas City Area Education Research Consortium.
  • Ann Jarrett is Teaching & Learning Director for the Missouri National Education Association.

Recently, a local author wrote a blog post, "Onward, Christian Gentry," which questioned how Christians — mainly white, evangelical Christians — approach living in the urban core. What role does faith play in developing urban communities in Kansas City? 

Beth Lipoff / KCUR

How long can you let your lawn grow before the city gets involved?

In Overland Park, Kansas, that number is 8 inches, according to Kim Hendershot, supervisor of code compliance for the city. In Parkville, Missouri, you can let it grow a whole foot. 

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR

Research into income mobility across US counties inspires Central Standard to take a roadtrip, talk to an economist and hear from locals with their own research and experience to share. Is the "land of opportunity" created by individuals or their environments?

Guests:

Violence in the urban core is all too familiar for Missouri. A recently released study from 2012 puts Missouri at the top of the list for inner city homicide. Steve Kraske asks why, and looks at what's being done locally to curb violent crime. 

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Controversy has swirled around the Bainbridge apartment complex on Armour Boulevard for years. A legal back-and-forth has accompanied the city's designation of the property as socially blighted. This discussion addresses larger issues about low-income housing and how it is -- and sometimes isn't -- integrated into the fabric of a neighborhood.

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