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UMKC Reaches Settlement With Defendants Over Demolished Student Housing On Oak Street

061520_lowe_oak place apartments.jpg
Courtesy of University News
The Oak Park Apartments were razed this summer.

The lawsuit continues against the architects and other designers of the Oak Place Apartments, which was plagued with pipe failures, mold and sagging floors, requiring the displacement of 464 students.

The University of Missouri has settled its lawsuit against six companies involved in the construction of now-demolished student housing at 5050 Oak Street near the UMKC campus.

Terms of the settlement were not disclosed, but the case was dismissed on Tuesday after the university said it had resolved its claims against the companies.

The lawsuit continues against the architects and other designers of Oak Place Apartments, which was plagued with pipe failures, mold and sagging floors, requiring the displacement of 464 students.

The building was razed this past summer.

The university sued 34 defendants in 2018, accusing them of recklessness in the design and construction of the building.

Most prominent among them was JE Dunn Construction, the general contractor on the project, and Gould Evans Associates, the architect.

JE Dunn, one of the best known commercial contractors in Kansas City, is one of the settling defendants. Gould Evans remains a defendant in the case.

None of the defendants or their lawyers could be reached for comment.

Earlier this year, the university said it had reached a settlement with various insurance carriers. The terms of that settlement were not disclosed.

Oak Place was built by a private developer and opened in 2008. It was purchased by the university for nearly $41 million in 2012. The building replaced a 60-year-old apartment complex, Twin Oaks, which was torn down.

The university is hoping that plans to extend Kansas City’s streetcar to an area nearby will stimulate development of the site, which has now been reduced to a grassy field.

Editor’s note: KCUR is licensed to the University of Missouri-Kansas City.

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