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'Unfortunately, it's just not unusual' when it comes to prison food causing long-term health problems

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Prison Food
Dea Brayden
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Flickr
Prison food can be unappealing, even inedible and it can cause health issues for prisoners even after their release.

Research shows that the food served to incarcerated people often does not meet basic standards of nutrition and quality. That reality can result in serious health complications, eating disorders or worse.

A group called Impact Justice published an in-depth report on this topic called "Eating Behind Bars: Ending the Hidden Punishment of Food in Prison."

Two researchers with that organization joined Up To Date to discuss their findings, and exoneree Ricky Kidd spoke on his experience eating the food served in prison — and the subsequent health problems he faced as a result.

  • Leslie Soble, senior program associate for Impact Justice
  • Heile Gantan, research fellow for Impact Justice
  • Ricky Kidd, exoneree who spent 23 years at Western Missouri Correctional Center
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As a host and contributor at KCUR, I seek to create a more informed citizenry and richer community. I want to enlighten and inspire our audience by delivering the information they need with accuracy and urgency, clarifying what’s complicated and teasing out the complexities of what seems simple. I work to craft conversations that reveal realities in our midst and model civil discourse in a divided world. Follow me on Twitter @ptsbrian or email me at brian@kcur.org.
As Up To Date’s associate producer, I construct daily conversations that give our listeners context to the issues of our time. I strive to provide a platform that holds those in power accountable, while also spotlighting the voices of Kansas City’s creatives and visionaries that may otherwise go unheard. Email me at zach@kcur.org.