Donald Trump | KCUR

Donald Trump

Segment 1: When it comes to what makes a president's speech memorable "ideas are the most important thing."

Rhetoric expert Robert Rowland acknowledged that not every U.S. president has produced a memorable speech like Lincoln's second inaugural address. Rowland laid out the ingredients found in the ones that have stood the test of time and gave examples of those which met or missed the criteria, including speeches by Reagan, Obama and Trump.

Segment 1: "Tough love, to me, means you love fiercely but not uncritically," said Susan Rice. 

Former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice recounted stories of her time as the 24th national security advisor, and what it was like to work so closely with President Barack Obama. Today, we take a second listen to a conversation on some of the best and worst things she saw during her time in Washington.

Segment 1: Analyzing impeachment from a historical perspective

Amidst the trial in Washington, it can be enlightening to look at how impeachment has evolved from since its beginnings in 13th-century England. We also discussed where this historical process fits into modern government.

Lynn Horsley / KCUR 89.3

U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, D-Kansas City, is calling on financial regulators to strengthen protections against a possible cyberattack from Iran. 

In a letter Wednesday to Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, Cleaver urged the department to "take all possible precautions" to protect the country's financial infrastructure.

This comes in the wake of Iran firing ballistic missiles Tuesday night at bases in Iraq that housed U.S. troops as retaliation for the American assassination of Qasem Soleimani.

The United States House of Representatives voted Wednesday on two articles of impeachment against President Donald J. Trump.

The first article charged Trump with abusing the power of his office. The second article charged him with obstruction of Congress. He is the third president in American history to be impeached by the House.

C-SPAN

The weeks of secret and public hearings in Washington, D.C., are over, the articles of impeachment have been drawn up and the U.S. House is set to vote next week on whether President Donald Trump obstructed Congress and abused power in withholding Ukrainian military aid over a sought-after investigation into a political rival. 

KCUR wanted to know how closely residents in the Kansas City metro were following what could be just the fourth impeachment in America’s history. Here’s what we found out. 

Segment 1: Richard Nixon's impeachment parallels that of President Donald Trump.

President Richard Nixon's impeachment trials were about more than just the Watergate scandal. Biographer John Farrell said Nixon's use of presidential power to advance his personal political ambition mirrors that of the current Oval Office occupant, who is currently being investigated by the U.S. House of Representaives.

Nadya Faulx / Kansas News Service

TOPEKA, Kansas — For much of 2019, the conventional wisdom among political operatives held that the 2020 U.S. Senate race in Kansas was Mike Pompeo’s for the taking.

The secretary of state and former CIA director could, many insiders believed, launch even a last-minute campaign and assume the inside track for the Republican nomination to replace retiring Sen. Pat Roberts. After all, he used to be a Republican congressman from Wichita.

The first week of Trump impeachment inquiry hearings is in the books.

If you were paying attention to the thousands of pages of closed-door testimonies, you would recognize some of the details that emerged.

But there were some new and important wrinkles from the public hearings with acting U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine William Taylor; George Kent, a top State Department official with oversight of Ukraine affairs; and Marie Yovanovitch, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, who described a plot to oust her led by President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani.

Updated on Nov. 13 at 8:49 a.m. ET

Public impeachment hearings begin Wednesday, and the first round of witnesses includes three career public servants who have testified behind closed doors that President Trump did link military aid and a White House meeting for Ukraine with a promise to investigate one of the president's domestic political opponents.

Frank Morris / KCUR and NPR

Most farmers haven't had a single good year since President Trump took office, and Trump’s policies on trade, immigration and ethanol are part of the problem.

Yet farmers, who broadly supported Trump in 2016, are sticking with him as the impeachment inquiry moves forward.

“You see everyone circling their wagons now, and the farm community is no different in that,” says John Herath, the news director at Farm Journal.

Segment 1: Research points to health dangers, but billions of pounds of Roundup are applied to plants each year.

Investigative journalist Carey Gillam has spent 20 years researching and reporting on the dangers of Monsanto's Roundup, and has seen the corporation attempt to discredit scientists and journalists. The product is increasingly popular, with global application increasing 16-fold since the 1990s. Gillam says, "it's not an understatement to say we're actually poisoning the planet."

 

Segment 1: How Ukranians view the whistleblower case

For many Americans, the whistleblower scandal surrounding President Trump is a matter of politics and presidency. For the other country involved, Ukraine, the perception of these events is part of a larger web of scandals.

  • Anna Yakutenko, Journalist for Kyiv Post

Segment 2: Hispanic Leadership Lowrider Bike Club

Segment 1: Long-time NPR reporter talks national economics and highlights his experience covering the Obama and Trump administrations.

Scott Horsley made the transition to NPR's chief economics correspondent earlier this year. He provided a rundown of the House's current impeachment inquiry and explained its impact on the U.S. economy. Horsley also shared experiences from his previous post reporting from the White House for the past decade.

Presidential candidates have been fanning out across Iowa for months ahead of the 2020 election, creating an opportunity for voters to get agricultural issues on the national agenda. 

In a move that critics say will hurt plants, animals and other species as they face mounting threats, the Trump administration is making major changes to how the Endangered Species Act is implemented. The U.S. Department of Interior on Monday announced a suite of long-anticipated revisions to the nation's premier wildlife conservation law, which is credited with bringing back the bald eagle and grizzly bears, among other species.

Gabby Poulos / Yarn Social

Kansas City knitters and crocheters are not immune to the ugly politics often associated with social media — though this may surprise anyone hanging onto the idea that only sweet old ladies knit.

At the end of June, a website called Ravelry banned users who actively voice their support for President Trump.

The site serves as a social space for 8 million fiber art enthusiasts, that is, people who make things with yarn.

Liam James Doyle / NPR

Former special counsel Robert Mueller is appearing in two separate hearings before the House judiciary and intelligence committees.

Though Mueller has said his report on Russian interference in the 2016 election is his testimony, lawmakers have insisted that he testify in person.

Watch the proceedings live.

Seg. 1: Immigrant Anxiety | Seg. 2: Volcano Gear

Jul 18, 2019

Segment 1: How Kansas City immigrants are dealing with threats of raids.

"Just in case" is the phrase Celia Calderon Ruiz uses to sum up how people in her community are dealing with the possibility of a raid in Kansas City. Our guests offer clarification on the constitutional rights of migrants, regardless of status.   

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

During a week when President Donald Trump continued attacks on four members of Congress after tweeting that they should "go back and help fix the totally broken and crime infested places from which they came," people of color in Kansas City are reacting with anger, frustration and sadness.

One emotion that's less common is surprise.

Segment 1: Kansas City area residents react to the president's Twitter attack

President Trump's tweets telling four Democratic congresswomen to "go back" to their countries of origin sparked outrage. A panel of women of color shared their thoughts on the president's remarks and the message his words send to minorities in this country. 

Segment 1: Former U.S. Congressman from Missouri feels Trump administration is 'illegitimate'

Former Republican Tom Coleman, left no doubt about his call for President Trump's impeachent and why he thinks the party should unite against the current administration. 

Segment 1: How tariffs are affecting  business, food producers and consumers. 

In May, China issued tariffs on U.S. goods, and just about everyone in the Heartland is feeling the impact. 

Segment 1: Kansas City native reveals how her interest in politics developed.

Sarah McCammon discussed her coverage of abortion including what has occurred in her home state, how she started in public radio and what her Kansas City childhood was like. 

Segment 2, beginning at 25:43: Kansas City mayoral candidate conversations

Emanuel Cleaver And Sharice Davids

May 30, 2019

U.S. Representatives Emanuel Cleaver and Sharice Davids discuss the latest developments in the nation's capital.

The Democrats from the 3rd District of Kansas and Missouri's Fifth District gave their thoughts on the Mueller Report, the impact of tariffs on farmers and taxpayers and the large pool of Democratic candidates for the 2020 election. 

NPR's Mara Liasson

Apr 8, 2019

The veteran journalist's path to NPR and what it's like working the political beat today.  

Mara Liasson started her career with NPR  in 1985 becoming one of the most highly respected voices in political journalism. She shared what it was like covering seven presidential elections and what her plans are for covering the one in 2020. 

  • Mara Liasson, NPR National Political Correspondent 

Catalin Abagiu / StoryCorps

It was days after the 2016 election when Joseph Weidknecht, a Trump supporter sporting a sign that read “Proud to Be Deplorable” and a “Make America Great Again” cap showed up at a march protesting the election of Donald Trump in Austin, Texas.

Amina Amdeen, a Muslim student at the University of Texas, was one of the marchers who came to the peaceful rally that day before part of the protest broke into violence.

PATIENTCARETECHNICIANSALARY.NET / FLICKR - CC

Even as it seeks to have the Affordable Care Act declared unconstitutional, the Trump administration on Monday reported that about 11.4 million people signed up for coverage in 2019 on the act’s state- and federally run exchanges.

That represents a dip from about 11.8 million in 2018, defying fears of a more precipitous drop after the Trump Administration cut promotion and outreach efforts and Congress eliminated the tax penalty for not having coverage.

Segment 1: Rep. Emanuel Cleaver discusses the president's budget proposal. 

In the House of Representatives, the Democratic Party is back in the majority, and hopes to work with Republicans on smoothing what Congressman Emanual Cleaver describes as, "a great deal of disruption in the goverment." Today, Cleaver explained why he thinks we need a trillion dollar transportation budget, and why he's still concerned about an attempt to secure funding for a border wall. 

The US Senate voted 59-41 Thursday to reject President Donald Trump’s declaration of a national emergency to build a barrier along the US-Mexico border. Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri was among the 12 Republicans who joined Democrats to go against the president on what some are calling an historic vote.

The Republican-led Senate sent a firm message to the White House, with several Republicans saying they could not support the president because they felt he did not have the authority to take such steps.

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