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Up To Date

Why McIntyre Witness Recanted | Crimefighting Kansas City Chiefs

Lamonte McIntyre seated wearing a headset and with a studio microphone in front of him
Luke X. Martin
/
KCUR
On October 20, 2017, one week after being exonerated of a double murder, Lamonte McIntyre appeared on KCUR's Up To Date. Additional information regarding the handling of his case by Kansas City, Kansas police and prosecutors continues to be uncovered.

The story of why the key witness in the 1994 trial of wrongfully convicted Lamonte McIntyre recanted and how the Kansas City Chiefs’ win in the 1970 Super Bowl helped bring about the end of the Kansas City mafia.

Segment 1, beginning at 4:39: The woman who falsely identified 17-year old Lamonte McIntyre in his 1994 trial says she was pressured by a Kansas City, Kansas police detective and coerced by a county prosecutor.

The witness was Niko Quinn, the detective, Roger Golubksi, and the assistant prosecutor was Terra Morehead. A joint investigation by KCUR and The Kansas City Star revealed numerous allegations of Golubski preying on and assaulting vulnerable Black women. Morehead, now a federal prosecutor, faced a series of ethics complaints. Kansas City Star columnist Melinda Henneberger spoke with Quinn to get her story.

Segment 2, beginning at 30:15: In 1970, the betting habits of the Chiefs' fans along with an FBI wiretap spelled the beginning of the mob's downfall.

It began with the Minnesota Vikings being favored to beat the Kansas City Chiefs in Super bowl IV. It ended with the arrest of Nick Civella, the patriarch of the Civella crime family. KCUR's Sam Zeff and Dan Margolies bring us the whole story.

Correction: During the interview about the Kansas City Chiefs and the mafia, Dan Margolies incorrectly stated, "They caught Ouseley talking on the phone to one of his soldiers." Dan should have said the person the FBI caught talking on the phone was Nick Civella.

When I host Up To Date each morning at 9 a.m., my aim is to engage the community in conversations about the Kansas City area’s challenges, hopes and opportunities. I try to ask the questions that listeners want answered about the day’s most pressing issues and provide a place for residents to engage directly with newsmakers. My email is steve@kcur.org.
As senior producer of Up To Date, I want our listeners to hear familiar and new voices that shine light on the issues and challenges facing the myriad communities KCUR serves, and to expose our audiences to the wonderful and the creative in the Kansas City area. Just as important to me is an obligation to mentor the next generation of producers to ensure that the important conversations continue. Reach me at alexanderdk@kcur.org.
Whether it’s something happening right now or something that happened 100 years ago, some stories don’t fit in the short few minutes of a newscast. As a podcast producer at KCUR, I help investigate questions and local curiosities in a way that brings listeners along for adventures with plot twists and thought-provoking ideas. Sometimes there isn’t an easy answer in the end – but my hope is that we all leave with a greater understanding of the city we live in. Reach me at mackenzie@kcur.org or find me on Twitter @_macmartin.
Chris Young is an Assistant Producer for KCUR’s Up To Date. Contact him at chrisy@kcur.org.