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Up To Date

Hitting The Streets With Vaccine Facts | Overland Park Mayoral Race | Restaurant Funding Inequality

Head on shot of two lines of cars separated by a line of orange traffic cones with health workers wearing coats and hats talking with drivers who have arrived at a mass vaccination site.
Carlos Moreno
/
KCUR
After vaccinations by appointment, mass vaccinations like the one at Arrowhead Stadium above, and even drive-thru vaccinations, health workers are now engaging in a door-to-door campaign to overcome vaccine hesitancy and assist those who want the COVID-19 vaccination.

A health center in Kansas City is going door to door to spread the word about COVID-19 vaccines, a summary of the candidates running for Overland Park mayor and federal grant money was less for restaurants east of Troost than for those west of the avenue.

Segment 1, beginning at 0:57:26 As COVID-19 cases rise across the state of Missouri, health workers are in neighborhoods to talk with residents one on one.

Despite creative advocacy efforts, the full vaccination rate in Kansas City, Missouri, is only 39%. Health workers from Samuel U. Rodgers Health Center are going old school, knocking on doors to answer questions about and offer help to residents wanting to be vaccinated.

"A lot of people just want to be heard and have their concerns addressed" says Catherine A. Wiley, Director of Marketing and Communications for the health center.

Segment 2, beginning at 26:42: Overland Park's mayoral race features four men looking to succeed retiring Mayor Carl Gerlach.

The candidates come from backgrounds in science, business development, law and business management. The major issues they face include government transparency, affordable housing and incentives given to developers.

After hosting a forum with the candidates, Shawnee Mission Post editor Kyle Palmer says, "All four candidates painted a pretty clear pictures of themselves and were articulate with their own visions."

The primary election is Tuesday, August 3 with the top two vote-getters advancing to the November 3 general election.

Segment 3, beginning at 39:42: Restaurants in Kansas City east of Troost not only received less grants, but less money per grant than restaurants west of Troost.

The federal Restaurant Revitalization Fund was intended to ease the financial burden faced by dining establishments hit by the economic impact of COVID-19.

Liz Cook calculated that for restaurants east of Troost who applied the average grant was $50,000 versus $311,000 for those located in areas west of the avenue. As Cook points out, "We know that disadvantaged groups also have a harder time navigating the banking system, they have less access to credit and they also have less trust in the financial institutions that you need to know how to naviagate to file an application and to file it successfully with all the proper paperwork."

When I host Up To Date each morning at 9 a.m., my aim is to engage the community in conversations about the Kansas City area’s challenges, hopes and opportunities. I try to ask the questions that listeners want answered about the day’s most pressing issues and provide a place for residents to engage directly with newsmakers. My email is steve@kcur.org.
Trevor Grandin is an intern for KCUR's Up To Date.
As Up To Date’s associate producer, I construct daily conversations that give our listeners context to the issues of our time. I strive to provide a platform that holds those in power accountable, while also spotlighting the voices of Kansas City’s creatives and visionaries that may otherwise go unheard. Email me at zach@kcur.org.
Reginald David is an assistant producer with Up To Date. You can reach him at reginalddavid@kcur.org.