Cyber Security | KCUR

Cyber Security

Segment 1: "When the Chiefs needed to pick up the yards, Damien Williams was there," said sports reporter Kennetra Pulliams.

In the wake of an historic Chiefs Super Bowl win, we discussed what went right on Sunday, which players could have also been in the running for MVP, and what the future could hold for the team. Plus, what Kansas City learned from the 2015 World Series parade when it comes to port-a-potties and keeping track of children.

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For the second time in four months, Truman Medical Centers has suffered a data breach, this one involving more than 114,000 patients.

The Kansas City safety net hospital informed the Department of Health and Human Services’ Office for Civil Rights that the cause of the breach was a laptop theft on Dec. 5.

Leslie Carto, a spokeswoman for the hospital, said the work-issued laptop was stolen from an employee’s vehicle.

The computer was password-protected, Carto said, and “there’s no evidence that any unauthorized party accessed, viewed or misused the information.”

Segment 1: Decades after desegregation, there remain students in the Kansas City area who are still not receiving a quality education. 

Education professor John Rury detailed the inequalities as they exist in urban and suburban school districts. As the Kansas City area expanded in the 1950s, wealth moved to the suburbs. The levels of poverty in many urban, black neighborhoods have remained in the 30-40 percentile. "This brings a whole host of issues that makes it very difficult for schools to function," Rury said. 

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Kansas City's Truman Medical Centers was hit with a ransomware attack on Tuesday morning that locked the hospital out of parts of its computer system.

The attackers demanded money to unlock the data, and the safety net hospital agreed to pay a small amount, Truman said in a statement Wednesday.

“TMC worked with a third-party negotiator, its cyber insurance carrier and outside cyber counsel to pay a small amount of money, for which the medical center was insured,” the statement said.

Segment 1: Former ambassador to the U.N., Israel,  Jordan and Russia critiqued American foreign policy in the Middle East.

President Trump took a new route with America's policy on Iran by making the decision to withraw from their nuclear treaty and reimpose sanctions on the country. Ambassador Pickering offered his views on the U.S. strategy in the region and how our role can help or hurt the cause of peace and security there.

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A medical group that provides anesthesia services to Kansas City metro hospitals has notified 3,472 patients that some of their personal information may have been compromised after surgery schedules were stolen from an employee’s car.

Anesthesia Associates of Kansas City posted a notice on its website that the surgery schedules may have included some patients’ names, dates of birth, types and dates of surgery, and the name of the patients’ surgeons.

Argonne National Laboratory

Kansas State University is now officially home to one of the best groups of cyber-defense trainees in the nation.

In December, the university's Cyber Defense Club won second place nationally and first place regionally in a competition hosted by the United States Department of Energy. The K-State students competed against 70 teams from 24 states at Argonne National Laboratory in Chicago, one of seven sites to host the contest.

Segment 1: The local impact of a minimum wage increase.

In November, 62% of Missouri voters supported Proposition B, a measure to raise the minimum wage across the state, gradually, to $12 an hour by 2023. On this episode, we explore what happens to local economies when the minimum wage increases and its societal effects.

Christiaan Colen / Creative Commons-Flickr

Officials at a medical practice in Blue Springs say they are taking steps to strengthen privacy protections after a ransomware attack affected nearly 45,000 patients.

Blue Springs Family Care discovered in May that hackers had installed malware and ransomware encryption programs on its computer system, giving them full access to patient records.

Ransomware is a kind of malware that locks up a computer. The attackers typically demand a ransom, often in Bitcoin or other cryptocurrencies, as a condition of unlocking the computer and allowing access to the system.

Sam Zeff / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: How Kansas City is protecting its digital data from hackers.

In light of recent cyberattacks in Atlanta and Baltimore, data security is becoming a larger focus of municipal governments across the country. Today, we looked at Kansas City's own data security, and some of the measures the city has taken to protect against ransomware and other harmful technologies.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission / Flickr - CC

Hackers have been infiltrating the networks of companies that run nuclear plants in the United States, including in Kansas, since May.

The New York Times reports that U.S. officials suspect foreign governments, including Russia, are behind the attacks. 

The University of Edinburgh

Nearly all your Web activity — from Google searches to your Amazon shopping cart — is saved, stored, and used to individualize the internet to you, or at least what an algorithm thinks is you. Today, we find out how your online footprint creates a digital profile, and where that profile goes wrong. Then, we consider whether the paradigm through which prospective reformers view problems in the education system needs to be changed.

Missouri Community College Association (MCCA)

Missouri’s 12 community colleges have created a new workforce training network.

Until now, community colleges could only work with businesses located in their geographical service area. Under this new agreement, called the Missouri Community College Workforce Development Network, Mark James, Chancellor of Kansas City's Metropolitan Community College, says the state’s colleges can share resources, expertise and even personnel. 

“We are essentially pledging to collaborate and assist each other if and when needed to meet any businesses’ workforce or training needs.”

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Every day it seems we hear news of another data breach — from 500 million Yahoo accounts to the latest WikiLeaks hacks

Even at the city level, officials are worried about cyber security threats.

Frank Morris / KCUR 89.3

Military installations in Missouri face budget uncertainty, according to U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill.  McCaskill, a Missouri Democrat who sits on the Armed Services Committee, has been touring bases in across the state this week. She talked with people who maintain B-2 stealth bombers at Whiteman Air Force Base, before making her way to the Honeywell plant in Kansas City, where parts for nuclear weapons are produced. 

She says she’s hearing that uncertainty about the military budget is making it harder to plan ahead.

When you make the jump into retirement, what will catch you? On this edition of Up to Date, the Smart Money Experts discuss the long-term prospects of Social Security and Medicare and how to prepare for an uncertain future. We also take a look at cyber-security and protecting your personal information in the digital era.

Guests:

A company that issues health care ID cards for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City and other insurers said it had experienced a data breach that may affect more than 400,000 Missouri policyholders.

Newkirk Products Inc. said the breached data varied by plan but generally only included information found on members’ ID cards.

Kelly Cannon, a spokeswoman for Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Kansas City, said financial and medical information was not exposed.

Dan Hesse on Up To Date
Brian Ellison / KCUR 89.3

Dan Hesse retired after seven years as CEO of Sprint in August 2014, he vowed to take at least a year "completely off."

The year has come and gone — and Hesse is busy again ... but it's a different kind of busy.

"I'd been accused by many people of being a serial workaholic," Hesse says. "I tried to have a balanced life, but I really focused on being the best leader and mentor I could be. I wanted to take some time to be the best father, husband, son and friend that I could be."

The University of Kansas is taking a bold step into the fight against cybercrime. It recently announced a $4.7 million, five-year grant from the National Science Foundation to train a new generation of cyberdefense experts who will be dedicated to public service.

Guest:

  • Bo Luo is an associate professor of electrical engineering and computer science at KU and the program leader of CyberCorps.

Imagine a blackout that lasts not days, but weeks or months. Veteran investigative reporter Ted Koppel discusses the life-threatening possibility of an attack on our power grid and how unprepared our government is for such a disaster.

Ted Koppel will be in Kansas City to discuss his new book, 'Lights Out: A Cyberattack, a Nation Unprepared, Surviving the Aftermath' at 7 p.m. on Wednesday, November 11 at Unity Temple on the Plaza. For admission information, visit www.rainydaybooks.com.

Missouri Auditor's Office

The social security numbers and other personal information of almost 1.5 million current and former Missouri public school students are in jeopardy, according to a state audit released Wednesday.

Hacked

Jul 30, 2015

In light of the data breach that has compromised thousands of Kansans' health records, we discuss how individuals and businesses can protect personal information from being hacked. 

Guests:

  • Dustin Jacobsen is the chief strategy officer for Flat Square Technology Group, Inc.
  • Brandon Holley is the business development manager for Network Technologies Inc.

Data Breach May Affect Thousands Of Kansans

Jul 28, 2015

Thousands of Kansans soon will be receiving letters notifying them that their electronic health records may have been compromised.

The letters are from a Fort Wayne, Ind., company that provides an online patient portal called NoMoreClipboard used by 18 Kansas hospitals and at least half a dozen clinics. Most are small-town hospitals in western and southeastern Kansas. The largest is in Hutchinson.

KHI News Service file photo

Paul Davis, a Lawrence attorney and former Democratic state representative who ran unsuccessfully for governor of Kansas last year, is leading a class action lawsuit against one of the three health insurance companies that administer Kansas Medicaid.

Davis’ firm, Fagan Emert & Davis, is seeking plaintiffs from the pool of Medicaid recipients whose care is coordinated by Amerigroup, one of three companies that received state contracts to run Medicaid through the state’s KanCare managed care program.

When it comes to internet crime, criminals are far ahead of law enforcement and the general public. As more and more hacks make headlines, we talk about our vulnerability as individuals and how to protect ourselves from a cyber attack.

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More than 389,000 Kansans and nearly 2 million Missourians were affected by last month’s massive cyberattack on Anthem Inc., the nation’s second largest health insurer, figures released by the company show.

“This data breach is so far-reaching that it impacts nearly one-third of our state’s population,” Missouri Department of Insurance Director John M. Huff said in a statement Monday.

Wikipedia Commons

The NSA’s monitoring programs are no secret anymore. But assuming you’re not someone with nefarious plans for national security, what does that mean for  online privacy?

In the first part of Thursday's Up to Date, we talk cybersecurity with expert David Fidler about how governments are responding, the long-term fallout from the Snowden case, and how far the U.S. needs to go when it comes to ferreting out the terrorists among us.

Computer Guys: Cyber Security

Feb 13, 2012

In Russia, a worm called Koobface wiggled away with millions of dollars using social networks like Facebook.

Computer Guys: The True Cost of a Computer Virus

Aug 15, 2011
stuartpilbrow / Flickr

Today on the show, we ask the Computer Guys to tell us everything they know about how we can protect ourselves from a computer virus, and exactly how much that should cost. Is free antivirus software more expensive than the paid version? Where can you get a reliable rating of the various anti-virus products, and what devices need protecting? Is there an anti-virus pill you can take?