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More artists will now have a say in what public art will look like at Kansas City International Airport's new $1.5 billion terminal.

With a construction budget that devotes $5.6 million for public art as part of the city's 1% for art program, where that art will be located and who gets to decide have been pressing issues. Construction is already underway, with the new terminal scheduled to open in 2023. 

Lisa Choules

A dancer who hears "elevé" knows to push herself up onto her toes. In 2010, when retired ballerina Lisa Choules needed an apt name for her fledgling dancewear company, the term sounded just right.

Everyone needed a lift: She was a single mom scouting for a new career; ballerinas needed a better-fitting leotard.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Stage names aren't just for actors. Scott "Rex" Hobart and the members of his honky tonk and country band, Rex Hobart and the Misery Boys, have used other people's names on stage since they started playing together in 1997.

But Hobart has another career, one that's off-stage.

Segment 1: A dementia-friendly KC.

What would it look like for a city to be "friendly" and accessible to people with dementia? We meet a sociologist looking to answer that question and find out how Kansas Citians are looking to implement a solution.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Some of the pieces in Clarissa Knighten's jewelry lines are over the top, and she knows it. But over-the-top is good for a couple of things: the runway, which she’ll hit during Kansas City Fashion Week, and temporarily taking on a new persona.

"Sometimes — I know from battling depression and bulimia — you have to step out of who you normally are, change things up," Knighten says.

U.S. Green Building Council

Why aren't people more panicked about climate change? Bob Berkebile thinks it has something to do with the complicated nature of the threat.

"We're talking about climate change, and specifically global warming, when it's frozen outside today," Berkebile says, citing the infamous and incorrect claim that winter weather is evidence against climate change. "It's not clear to (people) what the facts are, and it's time to change that."

Kevin Collison / CityScene KC

The bland exterior of the new Crossroads Hotel at 2101 Central may fool you, but once inside the historic brick shell you’ll discover and enjoy a post-industrial chic vibe that’s right out of New York’s famed SoHo District.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

For more than half a century, the huge star on top of a neon sign above Fun House Pizza and Pub served as a glowing beacon to cars passing by on 350 Highway in Raytown. But one morning in April, a crane took it down.

The sign had been mostly dark since last December when owner Gary Graham served his last pizza.

Donna Moore seated in front of a microphone in the KCUR studio
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Grassroots organization looks to bring legislative reform to Missouri statehouse.

When states fail to promote a culture of transparency, some organizations believe it falls on voters to bring about the needed change to their government. We learned about the Clean Missouri Initiative, which will appear on the state's November ballots, and calls for open records, a reduction of partisan gerrymandering and the elimination of lobbyist gifts in the General Assembly.  

John Caldwell / Compile KC

Coffee carafes were nearing empty and there was a focused silence inside the Plexpod Crossroads on Sunday. It was the last day of Compile KC, a new event dedicated to bringing resources to Kansas City-based nonprofits. 

Local designer and software consultant John Caldwell took his cue from an event called Coders for Charities, which paired charities with software developers.

Social Good Week / Flickr - CC

Segment 1: How hyper-connectivity and technology have democratized power.

Our world has changed a lot in the 21st century. New technologies like Twitter and KickStarter have enabled worldwide social movements. But how does this new power work?  One activist described the ways public influence is shifting, and what it might mean for our future.

Sharon Harter

City of Fountains. Heart of the Nation.

For more than 25 years, those words and an illustration of a blue and fuchsia fountain have served as the official seal of Kansas City, Missouri. It's been such an enduring logo that its designer, Patrice Eilts Jobe, was honored with a proclamation from Mayor Sly James on March 2.

But the design almost didn’t happen.

Segment 1: Local poet writes collection based on his working class roots. 

For Robert Stewart, poetry isn't ethereal — it's a working class endeavor. He shares how his background as a plumber's apprentice, ditch-digger and truck driver shaped his worldview as a writer. 

Super/Typical

Everybody pees, but who spends time thinking about it?

Anyone who plans their outings in consideration of public restroom locations thinks about it. Wheelchair users, pregnant women, or parents of small children, for instance. And, of course, trans and gender noncomforming folks who are continually warned by policymakers to unzip it only in the bathroom that corresponds to the gender on their birth certificates.

Courtesy of Martin Mendoza

Bailey Miller, an engineering graduate student at the University of Kansas, has a compelling goal: to be among the first astronauts to land on Mars.

He's off to a good start.

Miller was the leader of a seven-member team that won an international competition hosted by the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Their prompt was to design a spacecraft capable of reaching Mars, sustaining orbit and returning to Earth.

Laura Spencer / KCUR 89.3

In the early 20th century, people didn't have a lot of options for making the tradition of unwrapping gifts more festive. They'd cover packages with brown shipping paper or newspaper, or sometimes wallpaper or fabric.

Kansas City-based Hallmark Cards, Inc., gets credit for starting the modern-day gift wrap industry 100 years ago, an invention created out of necessity during the holiday season. 

The Nelson-Atkins Museum campus with an illuminated Bloch Building on right.
Charvex / Public Domain

It's been a decade since the Bloch Building began illuminating the east side of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, and its architect, Steven Holl, says it remains one of his most important works.

The sentiment was echoed by Time magazine in 2007, when it dubbed the structure that year's top "architectural marvel."

The Nelson-Atkins Museum campus with an illuminated Bloch Building on right.
Charvex / Public Domain

When the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art opened the Bloch Building, its "lens" architecture was so different from the existing museum that many didn't see how the two could stand side by side. Today, the architect of the addition, Steven Holl, talks about returning to his building ten years later.

Intel Free Press / Flickr - CC

Kansas City has its fair share of historic buildings, but they're not always easy to find and appreciate. Today, learn how a new guidebook is bringing these sites to people's attention. Then, pediatrician Dr.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

Although Steve Foutch likes to joke he started demolition 10 minutes after he got the keys to Kemper Arena from the city, his company held a formal groundbreaking ceremony Tuesday. 

What does the college campus of the future look like? An architect from a local firm sees some radically different changes.

Then: a recent article in The Kansas City Star says that the social scene here isn't inclusive of people of color. We'll hear how some young African-Americans don't feel like there's a place for them in the metro ... and how it's driving them to move elsewhere.

Guests:

Fringe Festival KC

What if your home could help you stay healthier? Today, we learn how smart toilets and sensor-packed floors could help more folks age in place and turn future houses into medical monitors. Then, we discuss a new, locally-produced film that examines how addiction to the internet affects the human psyche.

It's almost impossible to pass through Kansas City's suburbs without seeing an office park. They're so commonplace, we almost don't notice them. But, they're a big part of our suburban cityscape, and someone put them there on purpose. So who did this and why?

Plus, in the 1940s, a Kansas man made one small town into his scientific laboratory. How Roger Barker founded environmental psychology.

Guests:

Copyright 2017 KSMU. To see more, visit KSMU.

Christopher Bulle / Flickr -- CC

A local fashion designer put out a call to see if people would be interested in sewing lessons. The answer was a resounding yes. In a time when clothes are so cheap that they're practically disposable, we look into why there's a renewed interest in making and mending garments.

Plus, the National Storytelling Network's big annual conference kicks off in KC today. We hear from one of the participants.

Guests:

Laura Spencer / KCUR 89.3

“Makers” is a series that shares stories of why people are compelled to create something with their own hands. 

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3FM

Kansas Citians have a rare opportunity to spend some time inside a home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright on Saturday.

That's when the Sondern-Adler home opens to the public for an afternoon during the Roanoke Neighborhood Spring Home & Garden Tour.

Julie Denesha / KCUR

There's a new proposal from architecture firm Burns & McDonnell that would use private money to fund construction of a new terminal to replace existing facilities at Kansas City International Airport.

Kansas City Fashion Week

Kansas City takes the nickname 'Paris of the Plains' seriously, and not just because of our fountains. Today, we learn why Kansas City Fashion Week has designers, photographers, models, makeup artists, and stylists gathered in the Heartland. Then, the director of the Vatican Observatory looks at the intersection of religion and science. He'll also answer an "age-old" question for us: Should extraterrestrials be baptized?

Writers Guild Foundation

Despite its shoestring budget and remarkably short shooting schedule, High Noon is revered among cinephiles. Today, author Glenn Frankel reveals how the 1952 film reflects the turbulent political climate of the Red Scare. Then: Buildings can affect our sleep, what we eat and how we feel.

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