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Segment 1: Missouri Republicans want to see a "Cleaner Missouri" version of an initiative voters passed in 2018.

Missouri Republicans argue that Amendment 1, also known as Clean Missouri, is biased when it comes to drawing legislative boundaries, and that the state's Democratic Party will get an unfair number of seats in the General Assembly. Now, a so-called "Cleaner Missouri" proposal has been introduced. Proponents say it will not only expand upon some of the original initiative's language, but it will also make redistricting more fair. 

Segment 1: "Tough love, to me, means you love fiercely but not uncritically," said Susan Rice. 

Former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice recounted stories of her time as the 24th national security advisor, and what it was like to work so closely with President Barack Obama. Today, we take a second listen to a conversation on some of the best and worst things she saw during her time in Washington.

Segment 1: The Media Critics discuss Pompeo, the Washington Post, impeachment and more.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's behavior towards NPR's Mary Louise Kelly was a hot topic in this discussion with the Media Critics. Plus, a journalist's suspension from the Washington Post raised a deeper question from one of our guests: Are journalists allowed to exist in spaces outside of the newsroom, including social media?

The first week of Trump impeachment inquiry hearings is in the books.

If you were paying attention to the thousands of pages of closed-door testimonies, you would recognize some of the details that emerged.

But there were some new and important wrinkles from the public hearings with acting U.S. Ambassador to Ukraine William Taylor; George Kent, a top State Department official with oversight of Ukraine affairs; and Marie Yovanovitch, the former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, who described a plot to oust her led by President Trump's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani.

Segment 1: Two men formed an unlikely friendship through a shared tragedy.

Tariq Khamisa was a 20-year-old college student delivering a pizza in 1995 when he was shot and killed by 14-year-old Tony Hicks. Azim Khamisa said he reached out to Ples Felix, the grandfather of his son's murderer, because he saw "victims at both ends of the gun." They became friends and work together in addressing gun violence through The Forgiveness Project.

Segment 1: Three journalists based in Washington speak to the unique challenges of covering national politics up close.

Each day brings something exciting and newsworthy in Washington, D.C., whether it's an impeachment inquiry or a new health care policy. Three journalists spoke about navigating the political web of the Capitol, the "glorified stalking" of politicians for quotes, and the sheer enormity of working in the nation's hub for political decision-making. 

Segment 1: Long-time NPR reporter talks national economics and highlights his experience covering the Obama and Trump administrations.

Scott Horsley made the transition to NPR's chief economics correspondent earlier this year. He provided a rundown of the House's current impeachment inquiry and explained its impact on the U.S. economy. Horsley also shared experiences from his previous post reporting from the White House for the past decade.

Updated at 12:08 p.m. ET

The nation's top spy told lawmakers on Thursday that he supports the whistleblower whose complaint sparked the Ukraine affair but said he struggled to deal with how to handle the case inside the Trump administration.

Acting Director of National Intelligence Joseph Maguire told the House intelligence committee in an open hearing that he believed the whistleblower and the spy world's inspector general had acted in good faith and that he has tried to handle a unique situation as best he could.

Voting systems in the United States have come a long way since the hanging chads of the 2000 recount in Florida — but now cybersecurity is as big a concern as ballot fidelity.

Here's what you need to know.

The good news

Segment 1: Newest Kansas and Missouri lawmakers express frustration with statehouse power structures.

First-term Kansas and Missouri House representatives detailed the challenges they faced as members of the minority party in their respective chambers.

Segment 1: Kansas City native reveals how her interest in politics developed.

Sarah McCammon discussed her coverage of abortion including what has occurred in her home state, how she started in public radio and what her Kansas City childhood was like. 

Segment 2, beginning at 25:43: Kansas City mayoral candidate conversations

After decades of hearing the familiar theme of Morning Edition, listeners will awaken to a new sound beginning Monday, May 6. But don’t adjust your radio or smart speaker – it’s the same NPR you know and love, just with a fresh beat.

After forty years Morning Edition is getting a music theme “facelift” of sorts – with a composition that pays homage to BJ Leiderman’s original creation, and at the same time instills a sense of urgency in a time when breaking news is occurring with greater frequently.

NPR's Mara Liasson

Apr 8, 2019

The veteran journalist's path to NPR and what it's like working the political beat today.  

Mara Liasson started her career with NPR  in 1985 becoming one of the most highly respected voices in political journalism. She shared what it was like covering seven presidential elections and what her plans are for covering the one in 2020. 

  • Mara Liasson, NPR National Political Correspondent 

NPR

Michael Cohen, President Trump's former lawyer, is testifying on Capitol Hill. Cohen has been sentenced to three years in prison, to begin in May. He pleaded guilty last year to charges of campaign finance violations and other charges related to his work for Trump.

Kyle Cassidy / Wikimedia Commons

Public radio star Peter Sagal has not always been the dedicated long-distance runner he is today. After competing on his high school cross-country team, 25 years would pass before he took exercising seriously again. What started out as a goal to get healthy, led to 14 marathon finishes. Today, Sagal talked about the lessons he's learned, and how his running helped him get a handle on life during hard times.

Updated at 6:45 p.m. ET

Former President George H.W. Bush was remembered as "a great and noble man" by his eldest son, former President George W. Bush, at a solemn but joyous state funeral at Washington National Cathedral.

The cathedral bells tolled as the casket containing the 41st president was carried by a military honor guard down the center aisle on Wednesday morning.

Seated together on one side of the aisle were President Trump and former Democratic Presidents Barack Obama, Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter, along with their wives.

Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., is about to head home after losing her bid for re-election, and in defeat she's blaming her own Democratic Party for abandoning moderates.

McCaskill has represented Missouri in the Senate since 2007. During her tenure, President Obama lost Missouri twice and President Trump won it handily. McCaskill was one of 10 Senate Democrats running for re-election in states Trump won; four lost.

NPR's Live Election Blog

Nov 6, 2018
NPR

Follow live coverage of the 2018 midterm elections, including results and analysis. Get caught up on the latest news.

Ben Schumin / Wikimedia Commons

Segment 1: Are lobbyists the secret to keeping local companies competitive?

A man in a black suit and blue tie waved to an unpictured crowd after having just given a speech.
Gage Skidmore / Flickr - CC

Segment 1: Instead of a divided country, Sen. Blunt sees "great capacity to come together."

In a live broadcast from NPR studios in Washington, Missouri's junior U.S. senator weighs in on upcoming midterm elections and the fate of the state's senior senator, who's engaged in one of the hottest midterm races in the country. He also discusses his efforts on the behalf of Missourians in pushing legislation to help ease the opioid epidemic, and on a bill that would make air travel more traveler-friendly.

Office of U.S. Senator David Perdue

Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is set to face a second round of questions from the Senate Judiciary Committee on Thursday. He's expected to be questioned about his views on previous Supreme Court cases, as well as a range of policy issues. Kavanaugh is also likely to be questioned about his work on Ken Starr's independent counsel investigation of former President Bill Clinton, and his time working in the White House under former President George W. Bush.

Annette Elizabeth Allen for NPR

After a sometimes raucous day of opening statements on Tuesday, Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh is facing his first round of questioning from Senators on Wednesday. Members of the Senate Judiciary Committee want to know about Kavanaugh's position on a range of issues including abortion, healthcare and presidential power. The nominee also faces questions about his time working in the Bush administration and his time working under independent counsel Ken Starr.

Office of Senator Chuck Grassley

Opening statements are underway in the confirmation hearings for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh. Watch the hearing live.

Updated on June 15

Why did Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the census, approve adding a hotly contested citizenship question to 2020 census forms?

Doby / NPR

After House Speaker Paul Ryan announced today that he will not seek re-election in the fall, many are wondering who will next fill the role. NPR's Mara Liasson suggests the move signals a lack of confidence among Republicans who hope to maintain control of the lower chamber of Congress. Today, the veteran national political correspondent provided context for Ryan's decision, and helped untangle other complicated stories developing in the White House and on Capitol Hill.

Kansas City artist Amado Espinoza entered NPR Music's 2017 Tiny Desk Contest. This year's submissions are due by March 25.
Eduardo Osorio / Amado Espinoza

NPR Music's Tiny Desk Contest is kind of a big deal. From Tank and the Bangas to Fantastic Negrito, thousands of artists and bands from across the world enter each year for a chance at a featured video behind NPR Music's hallowed desk.

pip-utton.co.uk

For frequent listeners of NPR, there's no mistaking Wade Goodwyn's voice. Today, we sit down with the Dallas-based reporter and discuss his decades of experience reporting on national issues with a story-telling perspective. Then, we meet Pip Utton, whose one-man shows feature important leaders you might have heard of.

Sean Davis / Flickr - CC

In this encore presentation: Patsy Cline's last show was here in Kansas City in March of 1963; she died in a plane crash as she was leaving town. Nearly 55 years later, a young local singer shares how Patsy Cline has influenced her.

Then: Have you noticed that more and more people are saying "y'all"? A look at how the word has spread beyond its Southern roots.

Guests:

He's been called the "fastest-rising public-radio star in memory." Our conversation with Snap Judgment host Glynn Washington, from his upbringing in a religious cult to how he's innovating storytelling.

Guest:

This summer, NPR reporters are returning to their hometowns to see how they've changed. Sarah McCammon grew up in Kansas City – on the Missouri side of the state line.

Like a lot of places, Kansas City is experiencing a couple of major trends – suburban sprawl and, more recently, a downtown revitalization.

My two siblings who still live there are a pretty good example of this. My brother, Dan Fowler, is in his late 20s, works for a tech startup and, like many of his friends, lives in downtown Kansas City, Mo.

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