Melody Rowell | KCUR

Melody Rowell

Producer, Central Standard
Steinar Engeland / Unsplash

Segment 1: How sports journalists are adapting to a lack of sporting events.

The coronavirus has proven to be a huge disruption in the world of athletics. Aside from professional teams suspending seasons (to the dismay of thousands), sports journalists are also facing a major shift in how they find and report stories.

Steinar Engeland / Unsplash

Segment 1: How sports journalists are adapting to a lack of sporting events.

The coronavirus has proven to be a huge disruption in the world of athletics. Aside from professional teams suspending seasons (to the dismay of thousands), sports journalists are also facing a major shift in how they find and report stories.

DimitrI Karastelev / Unsplash

AUDIO FROM THIS BROADCAST IS NOT AVAILABLE

Segment 1: Understanding the basics of what a virus is

With the increase in COVID-19 cases in this country, questions are swirling around the novel coronavirus. We thought this a good time for a Virology 101 primer. Gene Olinger described how viruses work, why they like humans, and why it is difficult to kill a virus once it enters our bodies.

Segment 1: Can we really expect people to stay home from work when they're sick if they don't get paid sick leave?

In Missouri and Kansas, employers are not required to provide sick leave. What does that mean as we watch the coronavirus spread and workers are told to self-quarantine? 

Less than a week before the Missouri preisdential primaries, on the day that the Democratic field narrowed to a final two candidates, Kansas City area voters under 25 years old shared their journeys watching the process unfold so far. What are the issues that matter to them the most, and why? What do the candidates look like through that lens? Our roundtable includes two democrats, one republican, and two unaffiliated voters. A political science professor adds context to the young people's stories at the end of the hour.

Guests:

Segment 1: A former Kansas City journalist living in China reflects on life under partial lockdown.

As the Coronavirus becomes a bigger threat in the U.S., we hear dispatches from someone who has been in China this whole time. Kendrick Blackwood and his wife, Krista, are now teachers living with their teenage son in a partially quarantined Shenzhen, where their lives have been upended.

Segment 2, beginning at 20:47: The rise of secondhand shopping and Facebook groups that give things away for free.

Segment 1: UMKC political science professors give us a lesson in what socialism is, and what it isn't.

With a democratic frontrunner who doesn't shy away from being labeled a socialist, the need to understand the term (and its baggage in US politics) is more crucial than ever. We start with the basics and take it from there.

In a show inspired by the film Hidden Figures, we hear local stories, like the story of Ed Dwight, a KCK native, came close to being the black man on a multiracial mission to the moon dreamed up by John F. Kennedy. This show has been rebroadcast, in 2020, as a tribute to the memory of NASA mathematician Katherine Goble Johnson, whose huge role in historic space launches was not well-known until Hidden Figures came out. She died this week at the age of 101. Guests: 

Segment 1: Local musician AY has a new song out about his experience as a male victim of domestic abuse.

When he was going through the experience, he didn't know where to turn for help or how to talk about it. Now he's sharing his story to open up the conversation about who gets abused by who. Researchers and support organizations say that while intimate partner violence can happen to anyone, it's harder to get help and find the right resources if you're a man.

The comedy about moral philosophy just wrapped up its fourth and final season.

NBC's The Good Place captured the imaginations of people across all kinds of faiths because of the way it imagined what happens when we die. It also touched on existentialism and what it means to be human. After all, what does it mean to be a "good" person in our morally compromised world? What does it mean to be a "medium" person? (Listeners beware: spoilers will be aplenty).

Seg. 1: The famously dry comedian is coming to Kansas City and we're here for it.

You might remember her as the comedian who did a set about getting cancer, but there's a lot more to her awkward sense of humor, which she'll be bringing to the Uptown later this month.

Seg. 2, beginning at 14:49: The restaurant owner/chef is mixing things up in the Kansas City food scene.

Segment 1: What does it mean to be presidential?

Imagine a world in which campaigning for president was considered beneath the dignity of the office. That world used to be the United States! It's also one of the many takeaways from a recently published book from the University Press of Kansas that looks into how the office of the president has evolved in America's history. 

Segment 1: A KU professor's book explores the sense of place created by our technology.

Where do you live? What is your neighborhood? Is it a physical place — or a digital one? "The Digital City: Media and the Social Production of Place" argues that smartphones are replacing cities. It also looks into how smart cities, like Kansas City, privilege people who already have a lot of resources.

Segment 1: An article from The Atlantic sparked debate over the merits of gym class last year.

Gym class in school is supposed to be fun. But according to a study, it may have a negative impact on students. In today's conversation, we explore the merits of gym and how a new crop of physical education teachers is trying to make P.E. enjoyable for every kid.

Segment 1: Kansas lawmakers are debating a bill to end hair discrimination.

The idea behind the CROWN Act is to ban employers and schools from expecting people of color to adopt "white hair norms" in the workplace and the classroom. 

Segment 1: How Missouri is dealing with opioids.

After House Bill 188 died in the Senate last year, Missouri became the only state without a database to detect abuse. We're now starting to see some improvements, but it still remains a prevalant issue in the state.

Segment 1: Who gets to tell what stories? 

Controversy over a novel called “American Dirt” led to a canceled book tour—a week before author Jeanine Cummins was set to come to Kansas City. Critics have a problem with the fact that Cummins is white, yet wrote a book about a Mexican family trying to make it across the US-Mexico border.

Segment 1: MU and other universities are tracking attendance through a cellphone app.

Developed by a former Mizzou basketball coach, SpotterEDU has been used by MU to track attendance for student athletes for years and now they're expanding its use. MU says students can opt out if they're uncomfortable, but people across the country are concerned by the trend.

Segment 1: A young Kansas City poet reads Dear White Police Officer.

Veronica Clay was one of the featured performers at the Kansas City Jazz Museum for last year's Martin Luther King Day celebration (2019). This is a rebroadcast of a conversation about the poem she read, and her experience of race in Kansas City.

  • Veronica Clay, poet and spoken word artist

Segment 2: What premature birth can teach us about being human.

How Kansas City should be preparing for climate change.

Average temperatures in Kansas and Missouri are up a degree or two from a century ago. That may not seem like much, but only the Dust Bowl years were hotter than the last decade. KCUR's extensive reporting on this explains how climate change is already affecting us in the Kansas City metro area, as well as what we can do about it.

How do we honor America's most recognized Civil Rights leader, and what does it say about us?

Segment 1: If you haven't been paying attention to football lately, here's what you need to know.

This is why Kansas City is SO excited for Super Bowl LIV.

Segment 2, beginning at 21:34: What does this year's Super Bowl mean to generations of Chiefs fans?

Segment 1: Research shows white-sounding names curry favor in academic settings.

Xian Zhao's name means something to him. It means something to his parents. That's why he won't adopt what he calls an "anglo name." But his own research suggests he might be missing opportunities because of that.

  • Xian Zhao, researcher, University of Toronto

Segment 2, beginning at 14:47: A recent Calvin Arsenia album is a milestone in his professional and personal growth.

Segment 1: Meet the bar owner who doesn't think the customer is always right.

Caitlin Corcoran has been a force in the Kansas City food scene for a while now, most recently as the woman behind Ça Va. Her outspoken views on how to create a safe restaurant for both customers and staff have also made a name for her nationally. Does it mean that sometimes certain customers don't like her? Yes, but she's not losing sleep over it.

Segment 1: Health insurance can be hard to get in Kansas City, especially if you're Latino or an immigrant.

A recent study found that immigrants and U.S. born Latinos account for more than a third of uninsured people in Kansas City, based on the three largest counties in the metro.

Segment 1: What are the big housing and development stories in Kansas City right now?

The guiding question for KCUR's reporters headed into 2020 is: Where will we see cranes? This discussion provides context for an installment of our newsroom's State of Kansas City 2020 series.

Segment 1: What's the deal with this Bike Plan that advocates are trying to push through?

There is a plan for increasing bicycle safety in Kansas City that's been languishing in City Hall for almost a year. The death of a cyclist has ignited a groundswell of urgency for the city to take some kind of action. 

Segment 1: Will young voters hold their momentum in 2020?

The youth vote made a difference in the 2018 midterms in Kansas, as well as nationwide. Turnout was way up from 2014. As 2020 elections get closer, what are experts predicting now?

Segment 1: A new book from an MU professor says hidden fees are chipping away at the middle class.

A professor of History, Black Studies, and Public Affairs at Mizzou says banking fees, mortgage fees, student loan fees, and payday loan fees disproportionately affect people, with the wealthy being able to largely avoid them. 

Segment 1: A Kansas City musician rocks the violin in her new EP.

Tina Bilberry, known to fans as K'Tina, is a KCK-native who fuses international sounds in Crossed Conversations. Here's her story.

Segment 2, beginning at 21:24: Queer Eye's Antoni Porowski is in town with a cookbook.

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