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Segment 1: Decades after desegregation, there remain students in the Kansas City area who are still not receiving a quality education. 

Education professor John Rury detailed the inequalities as they exist in urban and suburban school districts. As the Kansas City area expanded in the 1950s, wealth moved to the suburbs. The levels of poverty in many urban, black neighborhoods have remained in the 30-40 percentile. "This brings a whole host of issues that makes it very difficult for schools to function," Rury said. 

Segment 1: What it's like to be the first woman in charge at the Kansas City Fire Department.

As Donna Maize takes over as Fire Chief, she makes Kansas City history and achieves a lifelong dream.

Segment 2, beginning at 18:30: How a paywall is changing everything for the Shawnee Mission Post.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

As nonbinary people gain more recognition, with Merriam-Webster adding "they/them" pronouns to its dictionary and celebrities like Queer Eye's Jonathan Van Ness coming out as nonbinary, members of Kansas City's nonbinary community hope to educate more people about their lives.

Segment 1: Gender-nonconforming people share their experience living as nonbinary.

The pronouns "they" and "them" have been added to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary to describe nonbinary individuals, but the transition to gender-neutral terms can be difficult for some to figure out. "It is hard," admits Shallyn Ward, who is nonbinary, "but it's not impossible." Today, a conversation about understanding the changing language etiquette, and what it's like living as nonbinary.

Segment 1: The way we remember Emmett Till is still rooted in race and geography.

A KU professor who thought he knew the Emmett Till story was shocked by what he learned when he traveled to the Mississippi Delta for himself. That sent him on a journey to try to sort through the tangled threads of this haunting history. 

Segment 2: Men and boys in ballet speak out.

Segment 1: Why the cost of bras that fit is an issue for teens.

Talking to grownups about wearing a bra is hard for pre-teens and teens in any income bracket, but getting bras that fit is that much harder when the social barrier is compounded by a financial one. How a lack of access to bras affects girls in school, and what one local activist is doing about it.

Seg. 1: Technology In Prison | Seg. 2: Unidentified

Aug 19, 2019

Segment 1: A KU research team got a grant to bring technology training to women's prisons.

The population of women in U.S. prisons has risen 834 percent over the past 40 years. More than half of the women now in prison are mothers of children under 18. After interruptions in their educations and resumes, technology training could help them begin planning for re-entry.

Seg. 1: Women In Law | Seg. 2: Body Image Research

Jul 11, 2019

Segment 1: Bra-Gate inspires a conversation about gender in the legal profession.

Three lawyers speak from personal experience, discussing pay equity, achieving partner status, re-entry to work after maternity leave, implicit bias in the courtroom, the high number of women who leave the profession after 7-10 years and more.

Segment 1: New research shows a difference between what we expect and what we experience when it comes to humor in romance. 

Data suggests that in heterosexual relationships, men tend not to recognize that their partner's sense of humor is a major determinant of long-term happiness. Why not?

  • Jeffrey Hall, professor of communication studies, University of Kansas

Segment 2: A nineteenth-century vegetarian settlement in Kansas inspires further investigation.

Segment 1: Medical marijuana in Kansas, and the use of hemp in farming

In the first conversation, reporter Nomin Ujyediin broke down why she thinks the path to legalization of medical marijuana in Kansas is a rocky one. Then, reporter Brian Grimmett discussed the industrialization of hemp in Kansas.

Segment 1: In honor of the Women's World Cup, we ask what's up with the sport here in Kansas City.

We lost our professional women's soccer team in 2017. Kansas City isn't alone; the national league is having a hard time maintaining enough teams to sustain their seasons, despite the sport's popularity among girls.

For nine weeks, Zyrie Berry-Henricks has been meeting with four other University of Kansas students to try to answer the question: What does it mean to be a man?

It’s part of KU’s Men’s Action Project, a 10-week program where male students discuss masculinity — both healthy and toxic.

Anna Selle

Allison Gliesman studied singing in high school and a little in college and knew the technical ins and outs. It took some distance from those lessons and a little experimenting for Gliesman's voice to take shape.

New York Yankees

Major League Baseball is staring down a gender problem. And despite initiatives meant to bring more women into its dugouts, executive offices and broadcast booths, everyone — including women in high-powered positions — says things won’t change quickly.

“Look, I think there’s no sugar-coating this. There’s a lot to do,” said Renee Tirado, MLB’s chief diversity officer.

City of Blue Springs

Blue Springs, Missouri, could join a growing list of cities across the country replacing using “he” with “they” in its city charter.

Many city charters and municipal codes in the Kansas City-area include gender-neutral terms such as “councilmember” or use both “his” and “her” pronouns, but if voters approve the amendment on April 2, Blue Springs would be the first city in the area with more than 30,000 people to use “they,” “them” and “their” in its city charter.

Big Stock

It's illegal for employers to discriminate against people who don't conform to gender stereotypes, the Missouri Supreme Court held Tuesday in a decision seen as a major victory for LGBTQ advocates.

The court ruled in a case involving a gay individual, Harold Lampley, who alleged that his employer discriminated against him because he didn’t exhibit stereotypically male behavior and apperance.

Seg. 1: Understanding Slang. Seg. 2: Women In Power.

Jan 24, 2019

Segment 1: An expert panel on slang today.

"Extra." "Mood." "We live in a society." "Fell off." Or, per one recent high-profile Twitter feud, "dog-walk" (verb, transitive). These are phrases you either get or you don't. But some of them aren't even new. We define them while also discussing where they come from, why we call them slang (and not just language) and how they spread to eventually become part of standard English. 

Segment 1: Fight the winter blues with adorable baby animals.

The Kansas City Zoo welcomed a baby king penguin named Blizzard. We hear about how Blizzard and other new babies are doing, along with the ways animals are "encouraged" to mate.

  • Sean Putney, Senior Director of Zoological Operations, Kansas City Zoo

Segment 2, beginning at 16:30: Kansas City filmmaker's latest work selected for Sundance Film Festival.

Segment 1: Teaching kids about identity.

Concepts like race, gender and social class can be difficult concepts to address — even for adults. So how do you talk to children about those ideas?

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

The Trump administration may be making a move toward redefining gender. That's according to a recent New York Times report, which explained that the new definition would limit gender to strictly male or female, a "biological, immutable condition determined by genitalia at birth."

This would roll back the Obama administration's efforts to loosen the definition of gender, recognizing it as an individual's choice, not based on the sex assigned at birth. 

Three political candidates, one woman and two men, stand on a debate stage as a seated audience looks on.
Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

Segment 1: As election draws nearer, results in Kansas governor's race are far from a foregone conclusion.

Seg. 1: Hir. Seg. 2: Story Of Ed Dwight

Jun 5, 2018

Segment 1: Comedic play at The Unicorn invites serious conversations on gender identity.

The comedy Hir revolves around the story of a transitioning teen and their dysfunctional family. Find out how one performer connects with their role on a personal level.

  • Ahafia Jurkiewicz-Miles, actor

The production of 'Hir' runs at The Unicorn Theater through June 24. For ticketing and information, visit UnicornTheatre.org.

Segment 1: What will an all-girls public education institute look like in Kansas City?

The Kansas City Girls Preparatory Academy will open its doors in 2019 as the first single-gender, open-enrollment charter public school in Kansas City. Today, we learn more about the benefits and drawbacks to single-sex education. 

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Former Kansas City mayoral candidate recalls facing racial and sex discrimination.

From her youth in rural Mississippi to growing up through the civil rights movement, to her eventual career in executive leadership, Janice Ellis spoke of her experiences navigating the political, corporate, and non-profit sectors as a black person, and as a woman.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

Can an all-girls charter school with a college prep curriculum help young women of color in Kansas City’s poorest neighborhoods succeed?

Tom Krebs thinks so, though he’s admittedly an odd champion for single-gender education.

“I’m a white guy from the East Coast. Why am I the leader of this effort?” Krebs, founding CEO of Kansas City Girls Preparatory Academy, said at a community meeting last week. “I’m hoping long term I won’t be.”

In fact, hiring someone to lead the charter school is “the biggest decision we’re going to make,” Krebs says.

On our First Friday arts show: a local artist has been keeping a dream journal for over 40 years. In his new exhibit, he's brought recurring objects from his dreams to life through sculpture. Then, we talk to the star of a one-woman show about fashion icon Diana Vreeland, and a band conductor on how his group keeps the Kansas City sound alive ... and how they're taking a step to address the gender imbalance in jazz.

Guests:

St. Louis Circuit Attorney's Office / Wikimedia Commons

Drag is big these days in pop culture, but the cross-dressing tradition goes back further than most people realize. Today, we trace its roots on the American frontier. Then, we take a close look with sociologist and researcher Jonathan Metzl at claims that gun violence in America is primarily a mental health issue, and not one related to the easy availability of firearms.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Victor Raider-Wexler, a venerable actor with a voice as deep as magma, has never performed as a woman before. 

“It’s a brand new thing," he says of his role in Spinning Tree Theatre's newest production. "But last Christmas I was Marley, and I’d never been a ghost before either.”

Meet the creative forces behind some of the exciting art stuff going on in September. We talk to the director of a play where ten manly explorers are played by women. Then, the dance troupe that choreographs shows off the sides of buildings. Finally, a KC musician who activates local dance floors and local politics.

Guests:

Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, Inc.

Lynn Novick has been making documentaries for more than two decades, most of them in collaboration with Ken Burns. Their latest project, The Vietnam War, is the subject of her conversation today with host Steve Kraske.

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