Youth Sports | KCUR

Youth Sports

Segment 1: Why and when high school athletes should be getting physicals

Instead of every year, high school athletes in Missouri are now required to get physical exams every other. It's a rule change that has some pediatricians worried, but may come as a relief for parents and student-athletes who are ultimately on the hook for paying for the exam.

John Cheng

A Grain Valley teen is one of five athletes picked to compete at the world gymnastics championships in Stuttgart, Germany for the United States women’s team.

Kara Eaker, 16, is competing for the U.S. on the senior level for her second straight year. She made the balance beam final at last year’s world championships in Doha, Qatar. 

Eaker looks back at the experience as a useful tool for this year’s competition, especially “being able to get used to going for that long (trip) away from home (and) also training with the gymnasts there in Doha.”

Shawnee Mission South High School

An increase in year-round sports has led to overuse injuries in young athletes, which raises the question: Is the quest for athletic glory worth the toll it exacts on kids?

At least one Kansas City-area sports official believes the hypercompetitive nature of high school sports has robbed it of its reason for being – namely, simply to have fun.  

“My experience is, by the time they become sophomores, juniors, seniors in high school, they start to burn out,” said John Johnson, athletic director of Shawnee Mission South High School.

Segment 1: Councilman Lee Barnes and candidate Dwayne Williams discuss their priorities for Kansas City.

Come June 18th voters citywide will be deciding on a councilman for Kansas City's Fifth District at-Large seat. Both candidates offered their plans for tax incentives, development east of Troost, violence and explained why their experiences makes them the best fit for a seat on the council. 

Segment 1: Six in 10 Americans failed the history portion of U.S. citizenship test.

Laura Spencer / KCUR 89.3

For nearly a decade, the city of Kansas City, Missouri, lost $1 million a year on Kemper Arena. There were talks of demolishing the 40-year-old building. Others fought to preserve it. 

Greg Echlin / KCUR 89.3

Major League Baseball’s All-Star Game is taking place this week in Washington, D.C., with Salvador Perez representing the Royals.

But there’s another Kansas City tie: The first All-Star game was played in 1933, the same year the Washington (D.C.) Senators went to the World Series with a first baseman who was known around Kansas City, Missouri. His name was Joe Kuhel (pronounced “cool”).