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Local groups celebrate 32nd ADA anniversary during Disability Pride Month

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Participants gather outside Yangon's City Hall after the annual White Cane Day walk.
Victoria Milko
/
NPR
A woman holds a white cane, a device used by blind and visually impaired people.

Advocates in the Kansas City area talk accessibility and disability pride ahead of the Americans with Disabilities Act's (ADA) anniversary, otherwise known as Disability Independence Day.

July is Disability Pride Month. July 26 is the anniversary of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), also called Disability Independence Day. The ADA is a civil rights law that encourages accessibility by barring discrimination against people with disabilities. The anniversary recognizes the progress made to include people with disabilities, but also highlights action still needed.

The Kansas City area is home to numerous groups that advocate for and serve people with disabilities. Speakers from The Whole Person, Alphapointe and Down Syndrome Innovations joined Steve Kraske to talk celebrations on Disability Independence Day and the further accessibility improvements needed across Kansas and Missouri.

  • Kendra Burgess, The Whole Person Public Policy Coordinator
  • Cheryl Rayburn, Alphapointe Manager of Donor Development and Community Relations
  • Sarah Mai, Down Syndrome Innovations Vice President of Lifespan Services
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When I host Up To Date each morning at 9 a.m., my aim is to engage the community in conversations about the Kansas City area’s challenges, hopes and opportunities. I try to ask the questions that listeners want answered about the day’s most pressing issues and provide a place for residents to engage directly with newsmakers. My email is steve@kcur.org.
Hannah Cole is an intern with KCUR's Up To Date.