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Segment 1: Investors invited to consider five areas in Kansas City, Missouri, in need of development capital.

The Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce is hosting a summit to introduce potential investors to federally designated "opportunity zones" that are ready for revitalizaton.  Participants explained the plan that focuses on establishing more jobs and more locally-owned businesses in economically disadvantaged communities. 

Seg. 1: Micro-Apartments | Seg. 2: Dad Jokes Beer

Jun 6, 2019

Segment 1: Affordability of Micro-Apartments

Developers plan to include micro-apartments as an option for "affordable housing" in the Midland building downtown. The plan has inspired an outcry from skeptical Kansas Citians: Is paying $750 for a tiny apartment truly affordable? A housing advocate and a business journalist weigh in.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Sugar Creek is a small community about nine miles east of downtown Kansas City. In 1904, Standard Oil opened an oil refinery there and immigrants from Eastern Europe were recruited to work at the plant.

Seg. 1: 3.2 Beer | Seg. 2: A Friend For Henry

Apr 3, 2019

Segment 1: 3.2 Beer.

As of April 1, grocery and convenience stores in Kansas are permitted to sell full-alcohol beer. In this conversation, we find out why the 3.2 alcohol limit was instituted in the first place and share memories of the infamous brew.

Frank Morris / NPR and KCUR

For many decades now, the only beer you could buy in Kansas grocery and convenience stores was limited to 3.2% alcohol. 

But on Monday, that 3.2 beer will be a thing of the past.

“It's a big step for the groceries and the state of Kansas,” says Dennis Toney, an executive with Ball’s Food Stores. “We’ve all wanted this for quite some time.”

Kansas is one of the last states to do away with this Depression-era alcohol, which looks likely to soon die out altogether.

Segment 1: Kansas women share stories of life on the range.

More women are running ranches in America, according to a recent New York Times article. So what does that phenomenon look like in Kansas? In this conversation, we hear stories out on the range from female ranchers in the heart of America.

Back in 2010, there were high hopes in Colorado that locally grown hops, the plant that gives beer a bitter or citrusy flavor, would help feed the then booming craft beer market. In just six years, the industry sprouted from almost nothing to 200 acres, according to the trade association Hop Growers of America.

KC Bier Co.

KC Bier Co. was the only brewery in Kansas City to win a medal at the 2018 World Beer Cup, and now it's releasing that beer for sale in bottles, the Kansas City Business Journal reports.

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Fall has arrived in Kansas City along with a vast selection of seasonal beer, as breweries new and old have rolled out their finest brews to coincide with the increasingly chilly weather.

But one cannot survive on beer alone. So, in the interest of keeping stomachs full and hearts warm, Central Standard's food critics recently shared some of their top food-and-beer pairings.

Mary Bloch, Around the Block:

Seg. 1: Food Halls. Seg. 2: Breweries.

Oct 26, 2018

Segment 1: Are food halls the next food trucks?

The Kansas City area now has two food halls, which are single buildings with lots of restaurant stalls inside. If you're thinking of a fancy food court, you're right. But rather than chain restaurants, food halls offer speciality foods from local vendors, like Yucatan-Turkish wings from Karbon in Parlor

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

The self-proclaimed largest craft brewery in Kansas is shutting down. Tallgrass Brewing, based in Manhattan, will close its doors, at least temporarily.

Tallgrass Brewing was founded in 2007 and expanded in 2015 to a 60,000-square foot facility, which the company said quadrupled its capacity. Tallgrass has been distributing beer in 18 states, according to the website.

When reached by phone, an employee at the Manhattan facility confirmed that the brewery is suspending operations immediately. She couldn't provide any other details.

Aviva Okeson-Haberman / KCUR 89.3

Almost two months after President Donald Trump placed tariffs on imported steel and aluminum, several major businesses in the Kansas City area are calling for the trade war to end, although many of them have yet to feel the full effect.

Courtesy Ruins Pub

Ryan Cavanaugh has a vision for downtown Topeka: a restaurant and pub called Brew Bank, where customers can access a wall of 20 electronic, self-serve beer taps as a way to mingle and try local brews.

“It’s just about a community experience,” he said. “For the patrons to be able to try all of these beers and try them responsibly in small amounts is just an exciting thing.”

The devices let customers use an electronic card to dispense brews.

“Let’s face it,” Cavanaugh said, “the technology’s just really cool.”

naturalflow / Flickr -- CC

What makes a song a Kansas City song? We revisit the classic "standards" that once defined the KC sound. Plus: a local writer takes us on a tour of the nearby breweries, distilleries and vineyards on both sides of the state line.

Guests:

Cheese + Beer

Dec 8, 2017
Kitchen Life of a Navy Wife / Flickr -- CC

Forget wine and cheese ... now there's beer and cheese. A local cheese expert tells us about the best beer and cheese pairings. Plus: a visit to a classic KC restaurant that brought back its fondue nights from the 1970s, then the Food Critics search out the best cheese dishes in and around town.

Guests:

Kansas City Crafts And Drafts For The Holidays

Dec 8, 2017
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

When you think of holiday beverages, you probably imagine eggnog and spiced cider before you think of beer. Today, we hear from brewers and brew-enthusiasts from Bier StationKC Bier Co., and Crane Brewing who think that's a shame. Find out what seasonal concoctions they're cooking up, how they critique a beer and when "pastry stouts" take flavoring too far.

Cpl. Samantha Braun / Office of Marine Corps Communication

Thanksgiving is practically upon us, marking the start of the holiday season. Today, we listen back to a conversation with Master Sommelier Doug Frost and others to get you prepared for winter partying with some great wine and drink pairing ideas. Then, we sit down with Vietnam veteran and poet John Musgrave.

Rob Bertholf / Flickr -- CC

It's one of the best times of the year to be outside. It's officially fall on the calendar, and after a hot September, it has finally cooled down.

In that spirit, KCUR’s Food Critics searched out the best outdoor dining spots on Friday's Central Standard. From a see-and-be-seen sidewalk café to something that's more secluded and romantic, they found a plethora of spots in and around KC to enjoy the outdoors with food and drink in hand.

Here are their recommendations:

Steve Bozak / Flickr -- CC

It's finally feeling like fall. To celebrate the start of crisp-weather season: a cocktail blogger shares her seasonal drink, The Early Fall Lowball, and we also talk to the 2017 winner of the World Champion Squirrel Cook Off. Then, a visit to a Bavarian-style biergarten, and the Food Critics search out the best outdoor dining spots in and around KC.

Guests:

Danny Wood / KCUR 89.3

First there was the craft beer craze and then craft distilling. Now soda pop is the latest beverage to get a craft makeover. The growth of craft soda comes despite corporate pop companies Coca-Cola and PepsiCo seeing U.S. soda consumption hit a 30-year low.

Wine And Food Fit For A Holiday Party

Dec 9, 2016
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The holiday season is here! That means tasty treats, good wine and great conversations. From pairings like a Trento sparkling wine with shrimp ceviche, Master of Wine Doug Frost and Room 39 owner, Chef Ted Habiger join us to share their expertise for hosting a party you won't soon forget. 

The wines and beer tasted during the program:

  • Giulio Ferrari - Fratelli Lunelli (Extra Brut)
  • Brian Carter Cellars - Oriana 2014
  • Elk Cove Vineyards - Pinot Noir 2014
  • Emperial Brewery - Kölsch

An interview with the outgoing managing editor of The Pitch, who's leaving town to write about the craft beer industry at Brewbound. We hear his take on KC's beer scene, which he covered for The Pitch, plus his assessment of the state of journalism here.

Guest:

  • Justin Kendall

A bucket of freshly harvested hops sits at Midwest Hop Producers, ready for processing in Plattsmouth, Nebraska.
Ariana Brocious / for Harvest Public Media

With craft beer booming and local breweries springing up all over the country, Midwest farmers are testing out ways to play a role in the growing market and, in the process, make local beer truly local.

Nearly all U.S. hops, which along with water, malt and yeast, comprise the base ingredients in beer, is grown in Oregon, Washington and Idaho. Farmers and researchers in the Midwest, though, say the region could be ripe for a local hops explosion.

Paul Andrews/paulandrewsphotography.com

Chuck Magerl grew up surrounded by family history.

During Prohibition, his grandfather was sent to Leavenworth Penitentiary for distributing alcohol.

One great-great grandfather was the sheriff of Jackson County, Missouri --  in 1869, the governor of Missouri sent a letter, authorizing him to capture Frank and Jesse James, dead or alive.

Another ancestor ran a saloon in Kansas City; a ledger book shows he paid $7 per barrel of beer in 1909.

He was a pioneer in the local craft beer and artisanal food movement before those were really a thing. Meet Chuck Magerl, the man who worked to change the liquor laws in Kansas to open the Free State Brewing Company — the first legal brewery in the state after Prohibition.

Guest:

A new Missouri law (SB 919) has been a source of contention among craft brewers and beer lovers in the state. Craft brewers feel that it will give a big boost to companies like Anheuser-Busch in convenience stores by letting them lease out refrigerator space. Lawmakers say that stores could stock craft brews in those cases.

Pittsburgh Craft Beers / Flickr

Bar food: it's salty, it's starchy, and you can usually pick it up with your hands. Beyond that, we make up our own rules. Whether it's by breaking the rules at the speakeasies of yesteryear, or enjoying a sandwich called a fluffernutter that's like a late-night pre-teen cabinet raid. A visit to Tom's Town Distilling Co., a spring-cheese tasting with a certified cheese expert and a critics roundtable on the best bar food in town.

Guests:

Updated 3/3/2016 - Legislation designed to expand the sales of cold beer in the Show-Me State is now on tap in the Missouri House.

The Senate on Thursday voted 18-14 to pass Senate Bill 919, with support and opposition coming from both sides of the political aisle.

The bill would allow beer companies to lease portable refrigeration units to grocers and convenience stores, and allow those same stores to sell beer in reusable containers known as growlers.

Courtesy of Boulevard Brewing Company

Boulevard Brewing Company will open a new visitor center this summer to accommodate high demand for tours and tastings.

Boulevard’s Jeff Krum says that while some 60,000 people toured the brewery last year, thousands more were turned away, especially on busy Saturdays in the summer.

“If you are not here and in line by 10 o’clock when we open the doors and begin to give away passes for that day’s tours, you’re out of luck because once we get to the end of that long line, all the tour passes for that day are gone,” Krum says.

Courtesy photo / Dean Realty

 

Perhaps you’ve seen the six-story abandoned building off of Interstate 35 at Southwest Boulevard in Kansas City — it towers over its neighbors.

 

There’s a website displayed on the side in huge font: imperialbrewery.com. Beer isn’t brewed there any longer, and you won't find any for sale on their website.

 

But what is the Imperial Brewery and where did it go?

 

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