Josh Hawley | KCUR

Josh Hawley

Updated at 3:30 p.m. with comments from Attorney General Eric Schmitt

Missouri Auditor Nicole Galloway released an audit critical of Josh Hawley’s tenure as attorney general, with the Democrat questioning how some of the GOP’s official’s campaign consultants interacted with governmental employees.

The audit, though, states that Galloway’s office “cannot conclude any laws were violated” from the interactions between the consultants and staff — which became a flashpoint near the end of Hawley’s successful 2018 contest against U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill. And attorneys for Hawley, who has sharply criticized Galloway for how she conducted the audit, took issue with the audit’s conclusions.

U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley has been critical of how state Auditor Nicole Galloway is conducting a closeout audit of his former state office, contending that the Democratic official has been treating him unfairly.

Galloway’s office directly addressed some of Hawley’s objections on Wednesday about the unreleased audit, noting that a staffer overseeing the look into his two-year tenure as attorney general was replaced to avoid any appearance of bias. Galloway’s director of quality control told House lawmakers that he doesn’t believe any bias occurred during the audit.

U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley is throwing his support behind legislation to help set up programs that could make it easier to pay for high-cost health care claims — including ones for people with pre-existing conditions.

Missouri has more than 10,000 untested rape kits sitting on shelves in police departments and hospitals — some have been there for decades — but the state is finally set to have a full inventory of those kits by the end of the month. 

Once the inventory is complete, Attorney General Eric Schmitt’s office can move forward with creating an electronic database to not only keep track of the untested kits, but to help prosecute rapists and provide justice for victims. 

Segment 1: What the junior senator from Missouri can gain from the issues he chooses to tackle.

Freshman Sen. Josh Hawley has been vociferous in his opposition to Facebook's influence, has ripped Democrats for their impeachment inquiry and, after visiting the Hong Kong protests, suggested in a tweet the city's chief executive should resign. Hear analysis of Hawley's political moves and how much they matter to Missouri voters.

Aviva Okeson-Haberman / KCUR 89.3 file photo

In a scathing letter to Facebook this week, Missouri U.S. Senator Josh Hawley, along with three of his Republican colleagues, renewed his criticism of the social media giant, saying the company censors conservative voices.

It’s Hawley’s latest call for more government scrutiny and regulation of tech companies stemming from concerns like data privacy, internet addiction and censorship. 

Segment 1: Missouri's junior senator is 'playing for that long future.'

Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley is taking aim at YouTube after The New York Times reported it was recommending videos of minors to users who watch sexually suggestive content.

The GOP senator wants to ban video-sharing services like YouTube from queuing up videos of minors to users — which he said would “place children’s safety over profits and pedophiles.”

Segment 1: Party that made gains in 2018 elections will have to find balance of personality, politics and policies for the next election cycle.

There's a large field of aspiring Democratic candidates who believe now is the best time to run for the White House. Our political panel gave us their take for sorting through the many presidential hopefuls, how a shared opposition can keep the party's factions together, and which issues are likely to resonate best with voters.

Samuel King / KCUR 89.3 file photo

Missouri U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley has been in office for 100 days. And in that relatively short time, the Republican has taken on tech giants like Google and Twitter, proposed new regulations for duck boats and co-authored a bill to lower the cost of prescription drugs. 

Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft has ended an investigation into whether U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley used the attorney general’s office to boost his Senate bid, concluding there’s not “reasonable trustworthy information that an offense has been committed.”

Kristofor Husted / KBIA file photo

This story has been updated to include statements from Missouri Sen. Josh Hawley and Rep. Sam Graves.

For the most part, the reactions of Kansas' and Missouri's congressional delegation to President Donald Trump's emergency declaration Friday fell along party lines.

The Missouri House committee tasked with investigating former Gov. Eric Greitens’ conduct released its final report on Monday — and a renewed a call for action by the state ethics commission.

C-SPAN

Missouri U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill expressed both her love for and frustration with her colleagues Thursday as she gave her formal farewell speech to the Senate.

Aviva Okeson-Haberman / KCUR 89.3 file photo

Updated at 7:20 p.m. Dec. 10 with a response to the investigation from the Office of the Attorney General.

Updated at 2:10 p.m. Dec. 10 with secretary of state's office requesting the auditor's help in the investigation— Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley is under investigation for possibly using "public funds" in his bid for U.S. Senate, the Secretary of State's Office announced Thursday.

Samuel King / KCUR 89.3

Gov. Mike Parson appointed state Treasurer Eric Schmitt as Missouri’s next attorney general Tuesday morning, filling the office that will be vacated by Josh Hawley, who was elected to the U.S. Senate last week.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3 file photo

Missouri U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill’s long political career appears to be over, having lost her re-election bid Tuesday night to Republican Attorney General Josh Hawley. McCaskill indicated in recent weeks that, no matter the outcome, this would likely be her last campaign.

She prided herself on reaching out not only to traditionally Democratic constituencies, but also rural areas in a state that has trended far more Republican since she was first elected to the Senate in 2006. But in the end, she got less than 30 percent of the rural vote, even as she won the state’s urban areas by close to 300,000 votes.

Samuel King / KCUR 89.3 file photo

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley will have a different title come January: U.S. senator. Hawley, a Republican, ousted incumbent Democrat Claire McCaskill in Tuesday’s midterm.

With the win, Republicans will hold both of Missouri’s seats in that chamber. It’ll also mean Gov. Mike Parson will need to appoint an interim attorney general who’ll serve through 2020.

Missouri Midterm Elections Results 2018

Nov 6, 2018
Crysta Henthorne / KCUR 89.3

Tuesday's general election in Missouri decided one of the most closely watched U.S. Senate races in the country. Missouri voters also were asked whether they want to raise the minimum wage, pay a higher gas tax, reform redistricting and ethics for state government and legalize medical marijuana.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3 / Senator Claire McCaskill / Flickr - CC

The midterm election is just a weekend away. Today, we covered the big races on both sides of the state line and some of the ballot measures Missouri voters are set to decide. In the Show-Me State, Attorney General Josh Hawley has been accused by Sen. Claire McCaskill of innapproriate use of consultants, but were the alleged misdeeds revealed too late to make a difference in the result? Meanwhile in Kansas, the contest between Secretary of State Kris Kobach and state Sen. Laura Kelly remains a virtual tie.

Samuel King / KCUR 89.3

With days left before the Nov. 6 midterm, Vice President Mike Pence visited Kansas City, Missouri, on Friday to lend support to a host of Republicans who are running for office on either side of the state line.

Clean Missouri
Erin Achenbach / St. Louis Public Radio file photo

Midterm elections are just around the corner, but much of Missouri's ballot is covered with pot — and redistricting, ethics rules, a gas tax and a minimum wage increase. Ballot questions join the U.S. Senate race as the big-ticket items on November 6 in Missouri. Host Brian Ellison talks with KCUR's Samuel King, Clean Missouri campaign director Sean Soendker Nicholson and Kansas City Star reporter Allison Kite.

KMBC-TV

Democratic U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill and her Republican challenger, Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley, faced off in their final debate Thursday at the KMBC-TV studios in Kansas City. Fittingly in a closely contested race for a federal seat, some national issues were at the forefront of the discussion.

The debate came hours after more mail bombs intended for Democratic leaders were intercepted before reaching their targets. Hawley condemned the threats, but also blamed Democrats for rising tensions.

It was less than two years ago that Josh Hawley did something no other Republican has accomplished in 28 years: Prevail in an attorney general’s race.

This November, Republicans are banking on Hawley to accomplish another milestone in defeating U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill. It’s an outcome that could determine whether the GOP retains control of the U.S. Senate and showcase whether Missouri is completely out of reach for the Democratic Party.

As she battles for a possible third term, U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill appears to be embracing her reputation as a dogged competitor who can give as good as she gets.

And she gives some of the credit to her mother, Betty McCaskill, who was the first woman elected to the Columbia City Council.

After Claire McCaskill lost the governor's race in 2004, she said her mother advised her to ignore the old Democratic state adage of focusing primarily on St. Louis, Kansas City and their suburbs in order to get elected.

Carolina Hidalgo / St. Louis Public Radio

With less than three weeks to go before the midterms, Democratic incumbent U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill and GOP Attorney General Josh Hawley debated each other about key topics in their race — with varying degrees of veracity. Here’s a few of their statements, fact-checked.

Alex Smith / KCUR 89.3

A once-obscure health insurance buzzword — pre-existing conditions — is taking over the U.S. Senate race in Missouri. And the seemingly narrow issue could have a wider effect on the federal health care law, depending on whether Republicans maintain control of the Senate after the Nov. 6 midterm election.

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley is heading into the final stretch of his Republican U.S. Senate bid with slightly more cash on hand than Democratic incumbent Claire McCaskill.

In their latest campaign-finance reports, Hawley reported $3.53 million in the bank, compared to $3.19 million for McCaskill, who is seeking her third term.

A women wearing glasses and a red sport coat witha white blouse behind at a microphone.
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Chiefs talk, the Kansas City Marathon, UMKC women's soccer and more.

Missouri Attorney General Josh Hawley is calling for a special counsel to investigate whether U.S. Sen. Dianne Feinstein and her staff improperly handled sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh.

Hawley, Missouri’s GOP nominee for the U.S. Senate, is joining a number of Republicans who are upset over how the letter from Christine Blasey Ford was leaked to the press several weeks ago.

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