methamphetamine | KCUR

methamphetamine

Frank Morris / KCUR/NPR

The sharp rise in opioid abuse and fatal overdoses has overshadowed another mounting drug problem: Methamphetamine use is rising across the country.

“Usage of methamphetamine nationally is at an all-time high,” says Erik Smith, assistant special agent in charge of the Drug Enforcement Administration’s Kansas City office.

Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst

Segment 1: Methamphetamine epidemic of the 90s hasn't gone away in Missouri, it's gotten worse.

Kansas City, Missouri, Police Department

Starting in the mid-1990s, Capt. Dan Cummings worked as an undercover cop going after meth suppliers in his hometown of Independence, Missouri.

He had grown up seeing what meth could do, so for him the work was personal.

“When I was a kid, a cousin brought a bag of this white powder in and said, ‘Man, hey, you gotta try this stuff. Man, you can go forever,’” Cummings says. “He did. He’s now passed on.”

FIle Photo / Kansas News Service

Anecdotal evidence from prosecutors across the state indicates opioid abuse is growing in Kansas, Attorney General Derek Schmidt said, but he urged lawmakers not to forget the state’s ongoing methamphetamine problem.

Schmidt answered questions about the issue Thursday from a panel of lawmakers in Topeka.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

A correctional officer stands accused of smuggling tobacco, drugs and other contraband into the Leavenworth Detention Center, U.S. Attorney for Kansas Barry Grissom announced Monday.

“Inmates could have their choice of vices,” Grissom said at a news conference. “Everything from methamphetamine to tobacco.”

Anthon Aiono, 28, of Platte City, Missouri, has been charged in federal court with conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine, providing methamphetamine to inmates, providing synthetic marijuana to inmates and providing tobacco products to inmates.

Imported Meth Finds Its Way To Missouri

Sep 21, 2015

Methamphetamine production has declined significantly in Missouri, but users of the drug have not decreased  due to a cheaper version coming from Mexico. Steve Kraske talks with Jim Salter of the Associated Press about the new supply and why Kansas City has more access to it.

Major Kansas City Meth Distributor Convicted

Nov 1, 2013

Discovery of a fake radiator packed with $9 million worth of methamphetamine along Interstate 29 has led to a guilty plea from the man alleged to be a major distributor of the drug in the Kansas City area.  

U.S. District Judge Brian Wimes ordered Porfirio Almeida-Perez and 31 co-defendants to pay a $9 million judgment.

It represents proceeds from 272 kilos of meth, based on a modest street price of $16,000 a pound.

How Meth Labs In Kansas City Are Changing

May 15, 2013
kcpd

Some of those who fight the making of methamphetamine in Kansas City don’t think the perils are clearly understood, by the public or by those who are manufacturing it.

Top Of The Morning News: March 14, 2013

Mar 14, 2013
Dan Verbeck / KCUR

The Kansas City Fire Department released a report on the explosion that happened at JJ's restaurant in February, and Missouri launched a new campaign to discourage meth "smurfing." These stories & more from KCUR.

Explosion Probe Incomplete

Frank Morris / KCUR

Missouri holds the dubious distinction of being #1 in domestic methamphetamine production. State Attorney General Chris Koster and Jean Peters Baker, the Jackson County Prosecutor, unveiled an effort to curb meth by shaming people who help drug producers get around limits on pseudoephedrine sales.  

Hotel Raid Leads to Meth, I.D. Theft Plea

Nov 28, 2011

Kansas City, MO. – A man who admits he and others made a million dollars from selling methamphetamine in the western Missouri area has given up the fight against those and other charges. The downfall of Brad Webster came in a raid on a Lees Summit hotel.

Webster pleaded guilty today to dealing Mexican made meth funneled by the pound through a Kansas City Kansas smuggler.

Springfield, Missouri – With methamphetamine lab busts on the rise in Missouri, Governor Jay Nixon is calling on lawmakers to make certain cold medicines available only by prescription. The idea is to limit access to pseudoephedrine, a key meth ingredient. Nixon was in Springfield Tuesday to discuss the proposal. KSMU's Missy Shelton was there and files this report.
--------

St. Louis, Mo. – Missouri has led the nation in the number of methamphetamine labs seized each year since 2001. Now several small towns in the state are attempting to curb the drug's production by making a key ingredient - pseudoephedrine - more difficult to get. Four towns and one county now require a prescription for cold medications such as Advil Cold and Sinus. But as St. Louis Public Radio's Maria Altman reports, some municipal officials say meth labs won't go away until the state passes a prescription-only law.