Up To Date | KCUR

Up To Date

Weekdays at 11 a.m.

Up To Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and culture — topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

Given the circumstances surrounding coronavirus and KCUR's role in keeping the community as updated as possible with credible and consistent information, Central Standard and Up To Date are combining resources to bring you daily updated coverage beginning each weekday morning at 9.

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Coming up the week of April 6, 2020:

  • Monday: Talking to Kids About COVID-19 / Ask an Expert / KC's Asian American Community
  • Tuesday: Coronavirus Myths & Facts / Leadership in Crisis / Pandemic Gardening
  • Wednesday: U.S. Rep. Vicky Hartzler / Enforcing Stay-at-Home / David Von Drehle / Media Critics
  • Thursday: U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver / COVID-19 & Missouri Corrections / Friendship & Social Media During Coronavirus
  • Friday: Topeka Mayor De La Isla / Religious Leaders Respond
Kristofor Husted / Harvest Public Media

Segment 1: How Missouri's 4th Congressional District is weathering the COVID-19 outbreak.

Various congressional actions will result in massive amounts of money being divided among individuals, businesses and banks within a couple of weeks. One Missouri congresswoman discussed if another stimulus will be needed, and if health care professionals in her district have the personal protective equipment they need.

Shannon Lindgren

Now that we’re spending more time at home, you might find yourself looking out your window more.

It’s unlikely you’ll get as lucky as one Kansas City woman did, though.

Shannon Lindgren was a little nervous when she and her husband had to start working from their 5th floor apartment on the Plaza. To give herself some space, she decided to convert their dining room into a makeshift office. In hindsight, this idea was a very good one.

Shortly after getting set up, Lindgren spotted a bird nest, with eggs, on the window ledge.

Florida Keys--Public Libraries / Flickr - CC

Segment 1: What we know about COVID-19, and what we don't

A lot is unknown about the novel coronavirus currently circulating the globe, giving rise to myths about how it spreads, how to keep it from spreading and how to reduce one's chances of getting infected. We asked an infectious disease specialist to clear up some common misconceptions.

Sharon McCutcheon / Unsplash

Segment 1: Tips for talking to children about the ongoing crisis.

Parents are under a lot of pressure these days as their kids ask questions about this new world they're living in. It's a lot of change all at once. But respect, honesty and understanding can go a long way when broaching the subject with young minds.

Matthew Ansley / Unsplash

Segment 1: Public defenders are calling prisons during pandemic ticking time bombs

In light of the ongoing COVID-19 scare, individual correctional facilities in Kansas and Missouri have decided to release certain prisoners, but public defenders and advocates say a statewide approach is needed to avoid a crisis behind bars.

Engin Akyur / Unsplash

Segment 1: Health care workers continue to work in unsafe environments.

A lack of protective gear and the silent nature of COVID-19 are just two new concerns piled on top of existing ones Kansas City health care providers deal with during the pandemic. Many are already coming to terms with the idea they will likely contract the virus.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: "No one is immune" to the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, said Mayor Carson Ross.

The spread of the new coronavirus has already delayed local elections in Blue Springs, Missouri, but the full extent of the damage is yet to be known. It will undoubtedly include hits to public health, residents' wallets, tax revenue and more, says the suburb's mayor.

Chelsea Engstrom / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: How the coronavirus pandemic is affecting the least fortunate among us.

One advocate for people experiencing homelessness says that population is always in crisis. When you add a worldwide pandemic to the mix, the stakes are even higher for them and the organizations that work to provide them the resources to survive.

C.J. Janovy / KCUR 89.3 file photo

Segment 1: North Kansas City responds to the coronavirus pandemic.

An immediate concern for this Northland municipality is warm weather attracting still too many people to public parks. In the medium- and long-term, local businesses will be hit hard — a revenue loss that will undoubtedly make a dent in the small city's budget.

Nomin Ujiyediin / Kansas News Service

Segment 1: Adapting Kansas counties, businesses, schools and employees to coronavirus

Gov. Laura Kelly has signed a series of executive orders aimed at safeguarding the health of Kansans during the COVID-19 pandemic. We asked her about criticism that the measures went too far, and whether she’s considering a statewide stay-at-home order.

Center School District / Facebook

Segment 1: Kansas City, Kansas, family stuck in Peru

His wife and daughter have been in Lima, Peru, since January, and Brian Copeland felt like spending some vacation time hanging out with them there. He didn't expect he'd end up spending weeks on lockdown in a three-bedroom apartment with six other people.

  • Brian Copeland, Kansas City, Kansas, resident

Segment 2, beginning at 15:59: Kansas public schools, in the days of coronavirus

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Coronavirus response in Wyandotte County

The Unified Government, representing one of the most diverse counties in Kansas and Missouri, faces some particular challenges in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. Mayor/CEO Alvey acknowledged communication is a problem for his administration, but is proud of efforts to translate safety materials for the Spanish-speaking community. The mayor also discussed the stay at home order that went into effect yesterday, the economic hit to be sustained because of it and what happens in a post-pandemic recovery.

Courtesy of Joanna Wilson

As word spread about the ordeal surrounding the first coronavirus death in Johnson County, Kansas, first through Joanna Wilson's Facebook updates and then through media reports, the metro area got its first glimpse of the health care system struggling to keep up — and the pain of necessary quarantine.

"We don't have a clue where he picked this up," Joanna Wilson told KCUR. The couple hadn't traveled recently. "We've gone to church, he goes to Home Depot, we run in Walmart," she said.

Harvesters

Segment 1: Wife's Facebook post seen by hundreds meant one more hospital visit with her husband before he died

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1, beginning at 4:12: Current Washington debates revolve around who should get a bailout due to the COVID-19 crisis.

The Raven Book Store / Facebook

To try to prevent the spread of COVID-19, most arts organizations in metro Kansas City have canceled performances or closed, at least temporarily. That's hitting revenue streams pretty hard, including independent artists who rely on crowds or personal contact to make their money.

“It’s an incredibly tough time,” said Maite Salazar, a poet and writer.

Stephanie McCabe / Unsplash

We know very little about how the coronavirus pandemic will play out in Kansas City. That’s making a lot of people really anxious.

“I see uncertainty as the core of the panic that we’re seeing right now,” says Katie Kriegshauser, director of the Kansas City Center for Anxiety Treatment.

Most people under quarantine in Wuhan, China, where the outbreak started, didn't end up getting COVID-19. They did, however, develop high levels of anxiety, isolation and psychological distress.

Courtesy of Kady McMaster

Segment 1: "I'm going to continue to work really hard, I'm just going to do it from home," said U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids.

Despite deciding to self-quarantine after potential exposure to the novel coronavirus, Kansas' U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids said she's still working to ensure any stimulus package out of the Capitol prioritizes people who need it most. She also emphasized the importance of practicing social distancing, listening to public health officials and taking the coronavirus situation seriously.

File photo by Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: What Washington lawmakers are working on in response to the spread of COVID-19.

The federal response to the spread of coronavirus had "a clunky start," said Missouri's senior U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt. Since then federal decision-makers have enabled state leaders, he said, and Missouri Gov. Mike Parson has enabled county and local leaders to get things done.

The Coronavirus Q&A, Is It Safe To Go To The Bank?

Mar 18, 2020
Curology / Unsplash

Panelists answered questions regarding the coronavirus and the resources available in the Kansas City area to diagnose and treat.

As part of special coverage of the novel coronavirus, KCUR 89.3 opened the phone lines to answer your questions. From hospital preparedness to mental health to where to find social services, our panel of experts fielded questions from around the metro including one senior in need of cash who wanted to know if even the drive-through at the bank could put her at risk.  

Steinar Engeland / Unsplash

Segment 1: How sports journalists are adapting to a lack of sporting events.

The coronavirus has proven to be a huge disruption in the world of athletics. Aside from professional teams suspending seasons (to the dismay of thousands), sports journalists are also facing a major shift in how they find and report stories.

Segment 1: Kansas' 2020 Democractic presidential primary will will work a little differently this year.

The 39 Democratic delegates in Kansas aren't up for grabs until May 2, but the voting process will look different from a traditional caucus. Voters this year will participate in a rank-choice system, in which Democrats will rank their top five candidates.

DimitrI Karastelev / Unsplash

AUDIO FROM THIS BROADCAST IS NOT AVAILABLE

Segment 1: Understanding the basics of what a virus is

With the increase in COVID-19 cases in this country, questions are swirling around the novel coronavirus. We thought this a good time for a Virology 101 primer. Gene Olinger described how viruses work, why they like humans, and why it is difficult to kill a virus once it enters our bodies.

Segment 1: How local churches are finding their way in the midst of coronavirus

Houses of worship have long served as a safe place for some people to gather in times of fear and uncertainty. But when large gatherings pose a threat to health, where do people turn? Today, we learn what three local churches are doing to serve their congregants while ensuring their health and safety are protected.

Segment 1: Answering your medical questions about coronavirus

The spread of coronavirus has monopolized the world’s attention and people have a lot of questions, understandably. Today, two medical experts look to answer them, and clear up some of the panic.

Segment 1: Lenexa, Kansas, is reconsidering its rules around homeless shelters.

Zoning restrictions in Lenexa caused a stir this winter because they precluded the Shawnee Mission Unitarian Universalist Church from operating a homeless shelter on their campus, which is an old school. A temporary solution was reached, but now the city is taking another look at how it regulates shelters. With possible changes on the horizon, advocates for those experiencing homelessness share their thoughts on the process and its outcomes.

Segment 1: Kansas City health experts on keeping your family prepared

With cases of COVID-19 popping up in Missouri and Kansas, we talk with local doctors about prudent precautions to keep your family safe, and to keep the virus from spreading. We also ask how and if Kansas City's most vulnerable — children and the elderly — are being affected. 

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Rosilyn Temple has been starting conversations about Kansas City's crime problem since 2014. Now, the U.S. Department of Justice is kicking in $75,000 to help her continue that mission for the next seven years.

"The community is angry," Temple said. "That's why we have so much violent crime today."

Segment 1: One proposed bill in Kansas legislature would allow state prisoners expected to die to be released  sooner.

Although the bill would extend Kansas' current 30-day compassionate release statute to 120 days, State Representative Highberger, said that it would only be "a drop in the bucket" for easing the state's prison overcrowding problem. We learned how the stalemate between abortion rights and Medicaid expansion may have resulted in other potential prison reform legislation being overlooked.

Segment 1: The Department of Justice's Project Safe Neighborhoods funds new initiative against violent crime in Kansas City, Missouri.

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