Up To Date | KCUR

Up To Date

Weekdays at 11 a.m.

Up To Date focuses on pressing issues, both local and national, including politics, economics, planning and design, history and culture — topics that have an impact on the lives of the Greater Kansas City region.

Coming up the week of May 27, 2019:

  • Monday: Special Programming
  • Tuesday: 5th District at-Large Kansas City Council Debate / Injuries in Youth Sports 
  • Wednesday: Kansas City Mayoral Candidate Quinton Lucas / Veterinarian Wayne Hunthausen
  • Thursday: Reps. Emanuel Cleaver and Sharice Davids / Weekend To-Do List
  • Friday: 4th District at-Large Kansas City Council Debate / Kansas Poet Laureate Huascar Medina

Segment 1: Mayoral candidate Jolie Justus shares her plans for Kansas City if elected.

Crime is one of the top concerns Jolie Justus hears when speaking with voters. The mayoral candidate explains why criminal justice reform is in her plans to address the city's crime rate. Justus also discussed her approach to using economic development incentives. 

Segment 1: Researchers explain the data of who is receiving an abortion and why.

A study by Guttmacher Institute analyzed data from their 2008 and 2014 surveys on abortion and found an increase in the proportion of low-income women who received abortions. The University of California San Francisco conducted its own study following women who were able to receive an abortion, and contrasted the unintended effects of pregnancy with those women who were denied an abortion.

Segment 1: A former Lenexa principal wants others suffering from mental illness to learn from the mistakes he made trying to handle his depression.

Diagnosed with major depressive disorder, Cory Strathman resigned from his job as an elementary school principal following a DUI arrest. Now receiving mental health care services, Strathman is sharing his battle in hopes to eliminate the social stigma that kept him from receiving care.

Segment 1: Could a retail model make health care in America more affordable?

As the country grapples with the ever-increasing cost of health care, we consider a model that minimizes the government's role and cuts out many middlemen. Two scholars describe a retail system that would subsidize care for the poor, allow consumers to make their own purchasing decisions, and help people focus on the care they want and value.

Segment 1: 4th District candidates for Kansas City Council.

Kansas City firefighter Geoff Jolley and co-founder of BikeWalkKC Eric Bunch are competing for the 4th District City Council seat vacated by mayoral candidate Jolie Justus. Both look to make the city safer and more responsive to residents, but the top priorities for the 4-year term look different for each.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

After years of complaints from customers, rising costs and declining service from contractors, the Kansas City Council voted to ditch the contractors and have city crews do weekly trash pick-ups throughout the city.

City council initially met the plan with skepticism, questioning how much money it would save the city, but they eventually passed the measure unanimously.

Michael Shaw, the city's Solid Waste Division director says he, too, is confident in the cost-savings estimates.

Segment 1: Kansas City council votes unanimously to bring all trash collection in-house.

Complaints about trash and recyclables pickup has convinced the city government to take over trash services throughout Kansas City, Missouri, beginning in May of 2020.  Private companies will continue to collect recylables in a plan projected to save $20 million. 

Segment 1: New data analysis of Kansas City's public school environment.

A new analysis shows public and charter schools in Kansas City are more segregated, more expensive to operate, and more complicated than they were 20 years ago. We talked with two officials behind the report about these issues and others, and discussed possible solutions. 

Segment 1: The impact of the Missouri Senate Conservative Caucus on the finals days of the 2019 session.

They've been called the "Chaos Caucus" and their latest efforts have involved  attempting blocks of a tax break bill for General Motors and a prescription-drug monitoring program. Statehouse reporters offered insight on these senators and how other Republicans view these fellow members of the GOP.

Seg. 1: Transforming American Prosecution | Seg. 2: Where Were You?

May 14, 2019

Segment 1: District attorneys' exercise of power has affected mass incarceration and convicted the innocent. 

The United States is the only country in the world that elects its prosecutors who can exert greater influence over criminal cases than judges. The author of "Charged" explained that while these prosecutors can be the "cause of enormous injustice" the pendulum may be swinging the other way as voters are putting more reform-minded candidates in office.

Segment 1: Why the Federal Emergency Managment Agency recommends flood coverage for everyone.

Flooding occurs in 90% of natural disasters in the United States, according to FEMA, and a quarter of all flood claims come from low-risk areas. We cover common questions about what is and isn't covered by flood and homeowners insurance, and discuss what the future of flood insurance might look like.

Segment 1: California city posts dramatic results in gun violence reduction.

Segment 1: Embankments necessary for flood managment can also have adverse affects.

Levees offer a sense of security but little regulation on their construction means they can actually make flooding worse for towns and farmland upriver.  Set-back levees found in Europe allow more room for rivers to run but their cost has slowed adoption of the system in the U.S. 

Seg. 1: Jayhawks' Adidas Contract | Seg. 2: KCPD 911 Dispatcher

May 8, 2019

Segment 1: Implications behind Jayhawks signing the $196 million deal. 

The University of Kansas renewed its contract with Adidas, even after the company entangled the school's athletic department in an FBI investigation of illegal payments to recruits' families. A look at why KU stayed with Adidas and "the business of college basketball."

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

"Mentoring should be transformational," says Henry Wash, "like a metamorphosis."

It certainly has been for Wash, who runs the nonprofit High Aspirations, a mentorship program that focuses on African American males between 8 and 18 years of age.

Wash has benefitted from two of Kansas City's most generous mentors, who passed down lessons he still uses in his work.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Students at Raytown's Westridge Elementary School were educated about autism spectrum disorder thanks to 9-year-old Mariah Turner.

Segment 1: Kansas City urban core program fills vital role of mentorship.

Kansas City's Henry Wash gives much credit to his mentor Henry Bloch for seeing him as a social entrepreneur and inspiring his nonprofit organization High Aspirations. Wash discussed the significant problems black boys face, the importance of them having consistent guidance, and the opening of his new facility. 

Luke X. Martin / KCUR

Domestic violence in Kansas is on the rise.

According to the Kansas Bureau of Investigations, homicides related to domestic violence doubled in Kansas in 2017 (the most recent year for which statistics are available). Johnson County saw a 20-year high in cases that had deadly outcomes in 2017, yet the largest county in the state has just one domestic violence shelter.

“In 2018 we turned away 2,500 people,” says Desiree Long, director of grants, quality assurance and housing at Safehome. That's a 29% increase from 2017.

Segment 1: Protest at the University of Missouri - Kansas City highlighted struggle universities and their students face over First Amendment right to free speech. 

The University of Missouri-Kansas City recently made headlines after an encounter between a protestor and guest speaker occurred on campus grounds. Two students present during the incident with opposite views shared a civil conversation about free speech, hate speech and where to draw the line.

Macjohn4 / Public Domain

When George Kessler drafted plans in 1893 for a parks and boulevard system in Kansas City, he created a model for cities throughout the world. From Mexico City to Denver and Indianapolis, Kessler had a hand in hundreds of projects.

Segment 1: The author of "One by One" shares his battle with opioid addiction.

Nicholas Bush found himself hiding from police for crimes related to his to an opioid addiction. After 10 years of drug abuse and the loss of two siblings, Bush was finally able to kick his habit after a dream involving his deceased sister.

Segment 1: Kansas City mourns the death of second major philanthropist in a week. 

Morton Sosland, who rose to run the publishing company that bears his family's name, died on April 25, just two days after he lost his friend and fellow city patron Henry Bloch. Friends recalled Morton's personality, generosity and legacy.     

Segment 1: Deadly domestic violence cases reached a twenty-year high in Johnson County, Kansas. 

Segment 1: An update on the Kansas Board of Regents' strategic 10-year plan for higher education which wraps next year.

Foresight 2020 has three goals for public universities in the Sunflower State but low unemployment and rising tuition have fewer Kansans seeking a college diploma. The president of the Board of Regents was asked about the plan's progress especially in meeting the state's workforce demand.

Segment 1: With only three weeks left in the regular legislative session there are still major issues to be addressed.

From asking Missourians to vote again on the Clean Missouri intitiative to redefining blight in order to curtail the use of TIF to a strict abortion bill, state lawmakers have their hands full for the rest of the session. A review of these and other major issues offered insight into the bills connected with each.

Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public Library

Inasmuch as Detroit relied on automobiles, or Pittsburgh on steel, Kansas City once relied on a meatpacking industry that, in turn, depended on a multi-ethnic, low-wage, but organized labor force.

Segment 1: Legal analyst Joan Biskupic dealves into the life of Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. 

There are many interpretations of the law, and Chief Justice John Roberts has assured Congress that his stance is neutral. A new book on his life and times shows that's not always the case, and perhaps there's more that goes into Roberts' rationale than he wants to believe.   

Segment 1: Concerns linger regarding Lake City Army Ammunition Plant.

The largest manufacturing plant for smaller caliber rounds is in Independence, Missouri. It suffered an accidental explosion in 2017 causing the death of one person and injuring four more.  Chris Haxel explained what contributed to the fatal event and the operation's questionable safety record under the current contractor.

Segment 1: Kansas City mourns the death of philanthropist Henry Bloch.

Henry Bloch, co-founder of the tax preparation firm H&R Block and World War II veteran, has had an immense impact on Kansas City. His legacy will persist through the institutions he helped established and support. Today, a look at how his contributions were aimed to serve the community he loved. 

Sgt. 1st Class Anthony L. Taylor / U.S. Army

This just in: The National Football League is hiring! But unless you’re about 20 years old and have been preparing for the NFL your entire life, you’re better off watching the draft live on TV with millions of other fans. Commentator Victor Wishna explains why in this month’s edition of 'A Fan’s Notes.'

Don’t let the calendar fool you. Fans feel that distinct chill in the air, which can only mean one thing: Football season is here.

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