craft beer | KCUR

craft beer

Segment 1: Investors invited to consider five areas in Kansas City, Missouri, in need of development capital.

The Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce is hosting a summit to introduce potential investors to federally designated "opportunity zones" that are ready for revitalizaton.  Participants explained the plan that focuses on establishing more jobs and more locally-owned businesses in economically disadvantaged communities. 

Betty Rae's

For morel mushroom enthusiasts, hunting — and eating — season never feels long enough. If only the fungusy goodness could be prolonged somehow…

Chad Tillman and David Friesen have cracked the code, giving the fungi a longer life by putting them in beer and ice cream.

"The concept is, let's make a beer, and we can release it a little later," says Tillman, a chef at Freshwater who recently teamed with Crane Brewing in Raytown. "No one's eating morel mushrooms right around this time unless you're from the north."

Seg. 1: 3.2 Beer | Seg. 2: A Friend For Henry

Apr 3, 2019

Segment 1: 3.2 Beer.

As of April 1, grocery and convenience stores in Kansas are permitted to sell full-alcohol beer. In this conversation, we find out why the 3.2 alcohol limit was instituted in the first place and share memories of the infamous brew.

Frank Morris / NPR and KCUR

For many decades now, the only beer you could buy in Kansas grocery and convenience stores was limited to 3.2% alcohol. 

But on Monday, that 3.2 beer will be a thing of the past.

“It's a big step for the groceries and the state of Kansas,” says Dennis Toney, an executive with Ball’s Food Stores. “We’ve all wanted this for quite some time.”

Kansas is one of the last states to do away with this Depression-era alcohol, which looks likely to soon die out altogether.

Segment 1: Kansas women share stories of life on the range.

More women are running ranches in America, according to a recent New York Times article. So what does that phenomenon look like in Kansas? In this conversation, we hear stories out on the range from female ranchers in the heart of America.

Sam Zeff / KCUR 89.3

Even breweries are feeling the pinch of the partial federal government shutdown.  

“The regulating body that we have to submit all of our labels to, to get approved by is shut down,” says James Stutsman, founder of City Barrel Brewing.

Stutsman shared his story on KCUR's Central Standard Wednesday.

Back in 2010, there were high hopes in Colorado that locally grown hops, the plant that gives beer a bitter or citrusy flavor, would help feed the then booming craft beer market. In just six years, the industry sprouted from almost nothing to 200 acres, according to the trade association Hop Growers of America.