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Segment 1: How voters are feeling the day after the 2020 Missouri Democratic Primary.

Yesterday’s primary in Missouri and several other states may have been a turning point in the selection of a democratic nominee, but how we're feeling is a mixed bag. Here's just a sampling of what people expressed: disappointed, excited, frustrated, and indifferent.

  • Beth Vonnahme, associate professor of political science, UMKC

Segment 2, beginning at 19:40: Looking back at great men with the men who looked up to them.

Segment 1: In 1990, Deanna Dikeman took a photo of her parents waving goodbye to her as she drove away.

She continued to take these pictures for decades and today, what started as random keepsakes is now a series of photos spanning through her father’s death until her mother passed away. Since releasing “Leaving and Waving,” she has also received comments from people who can see moments from their own lives, reflected in hers.

Anne Kniggendorf / KCUR 89.3

Cynthia Hardeman, a playwright, knew that families along the Troost Corridor enjoyed the Drama Time children's program that she and performer Victoria Barbee created in 2017.

The 10-week program, where kids could show up, slip into character and act out a story completely different from their own, was popular. But until a few months ago, she didn’t have a permanent address for that project, and worked out a borrowed temporary space at Just Off Broadway Theatre.

Gordon Parks / Gordon Parks Foundation

Before Cassius Clay took the name Muhammad Ali, he was a 22-year-old who’d been rechristened “the champ,” the greatest boxer in the world.

Long-time Life magazine photojournalist and renaissance man Gordon Parks was assigned to cover the young man twice, once in 1966 and again in 1970. What Parks found after many meetings was a 24-year-old with bruised fists looking for approval — a side of the superstar the public hadn't seen.

Segment 1: Environmentalism and the outdoors have long been seen as safe spaces for white people.

The concerns of climate change action organizations are wide-ranging and well-founded, but membership is largely white and adult. Learn the benefits and challenges of adding young people of color to these groups, apart from just making them more reflective of the communities they serve. The founder of an Atlanta group and the head of a Kansas City organization explained how they are bringing diversity and youth to the environmental ranks.

B.A. Van Sise / One Second

A little boy in traditional Italian clothing twirls while hanging onto the skirt of his mother's 18th century peasant dress. The two are in a Columbus Day parade in New York City, and photographer B.A. Van Sise figured it was the best shot he'd get that day.

After receiving a box of 35 mm film as a gift, Van Sise, who shoots for Atlas Obscura and Buzzfeed, set a challenge for himself: Take one photo a day with real film. The box contained enough for one year.

Segment 1: Missouri's junior senator is 'playing for that long future.'

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Crews are hard at work at Kansas City International Airport tearing down Terminal A and recycling its components to make way for a new, greener single terminal.

There have been no explosions, no big building collapse — and for good reason, says deputy director Justin Meyer.

Seg. 1: Photojournalism | Seg. 2: Student Loan Debt

Jul 1, 2019

Segment 1: A difficult image re-ignites debate over ethics in photography.

In a recent photograph, a migrant from El Salvador lies face down in water alongside his small daughter. The two have drowned on their quest to enter the United States. The image is part of ongoing debate about what it means to document responsibly.

  • Keith Greenwood, associate professor, University of Missouri School of Journalism

Segment 2: What Kansas Citians would do if their student-loan debt disappeared.

Terry Evans / terryevansphotography.com

Kansas City native Terry Evans has seen things firsthand that most of us never will: a melting glacier crumbling into the waters of Greenland, the breakage of land at fracking sites in North Dakota

But Evans keeps returning to her pioneering work documenting the Kansas prairie, even though she never intended to become a landscape photographer at all.

Portrait Session With Terry Evans

Apr 19, 2019

Terry Evans has photographed the heart of industrial America, where she revealed the effects of pollutants on communities, as well as the glacial peaks of Greenland, observing the effects of climate change in an otherwise untouched part of the world.

Her adventures began when a camera gave her the chance to photograph Bobby Kennedy when he passed through Lawrence, Kansas on his presidential campaign in 1968.

Segment 1: Cycling, Class, and Race

Bike-friendly cities shouldn't be designed for one particular demographic or social class in mind. On this episode, we explore the question: how can Kansas City provide a bike-able city for everyone?

Segment 1: What draws people to hate movements and how to escape 

Mindy Corporon, whose father and son were murdered by a neo-Nazi outside the Jewish Community Center in 2014, hopes to promote understanding and encourage kindness with her SevenDays Foundation. Hear the story behind her relationship with former white supremacist Christian Picciolini

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

In early March, a new wall started snaking its way through the grass just east of the Bloch Building at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art.

British artist Andy Goldsworthy’s "Walking Wall" begins with this section. In a few weeks, it will start to move across Rockhill Road, forcing the street to be closed from May 12 to June 3.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Kansas City photographers William Fambrough and Matthew Washington captured the African-American experience in Kansas City. 

For a long time African Americans did not have the same documented written sources as others in this country. Historian Delia Cook Gillis says this is one reason why visual images are important. They document lost narratives with an artistic story. Gillis talked about the importance of remembering African American history, and about two photographers who helped to do just that in Kansas City.  

Segment 1: Mark Twain's love letter to American cuisine.

Samuel Clemens, AKA Mark Twain, was an avid writer and traveler. He was also a champion of America's regional foods. While homesick in Europe, he wrote an extensive list of the foods he missed, like prairie hen and peach cobbler. On this episode, we speak with the author who's been following in Twain's culinary footsteps, first for a book in 2011, and now for a podcast.

Photographing Rock Stars

Dec 7, 2018

On display at the Kansas City Public Library are iconic photographs from Rolling Stone magazine, taken in the 1960s and '70s. The man behind the camera was Baron Wolman, the magazine's first Chief Photographer. His pictures of rock stars like Jimi Hendrix and Mick Jagger influence the way we still think about their star power, and helped pioneer the field of music journalism.

Succotash / Facebook

Kansas City chef Beth Barden just finished a job she never anticipated having: food-stylist for the new coffee table book "Queer Eye: Love Yourself, Love Your Life."

Like the "Queer Eye" television show, which recently wrapped filming its third season in Kansas City, the book is full of lifestyle advice, with pearls of widsom ranging from how to select the right cut of denim to what your go-to meal says about you.  

Americans with disabilities is a community anyone can join at any time. It’s a community that demands infrastructural and political changes that ultimately benefit everyone, yet it’s a community that is often ignored, sidelined or patronized.

“For years, there were ugly laws that were in place that kept cripples from being out in public. We were locked away in institutions, we were left at home, we were sight unseen. There was a stigma associated with it,” says artist Kathryne Husk.

Segment 1: Local man's shares story behind an American prison riot during the Vietnam War.

50 years have passed since a riot occured at a notorious American military prison in Vietnam. A jail to house not enemy fighters, but American soldiers. On this episode, we learn about a Kansas City native's involvement in the uprising and the meaning behind it. 

Sharon Rodriguez

“I thought it was a Boy Scout weekend.”

That was photographer Sharon Rodriguez’s initial reaction when she encountered a homeless camp near her Olathe residence in 2014.

Once she realized that homeless individuals were living under the tarps, Rodriguez had a lot of questions.

“Who are they, and why are they homeless?” she remembers thinking. “That started the journey of me finding out more.”

Shy Boys

Segment 1: For All The World To See exhibit at the Black Archives of Mid-America.

A nationally touring exhibit from NEH on the Road has made its way to Kansas City. "For All The World To See" displays photographs and other visuals from the civil rights era. We talked about the ways art and culture influence each other.

Segment 1: A puppeteer takes on a beloved childhood classic with virtually no narrative, but lots of dogs.

Mesner Puppet Theater is staging two very different productions this summer: P.D. Eastman's Go, Dog, Go! and The Tempest, by William Shakespeare.

Segment 2, beginning at 12:35: A photographer on being the artist-in-residence at the Missouri State Fair.

A portrait isn't just about capturing someone's literal likeness. It's about capturing the inner essence. So how is it done? And how is it done well? We host a roundtable discussion with Kansas City artists — from painter to doll-maker — to explore the ins and outs of portraiture in various mediums.

Guests:

Ubah Kariye

With the instant and reliable nature of cell-phone photography, most people have little need for disposable cameras. The old-school tools proved perfect, however, for a group of refugees documenting their new lives in Kansas City.

A show of their photography opens Friday at the Kansas City Public Library, in an exhibition called "Indisposable: KC Cultures."

The photographers originally came from countries including the Democratic Republic of Congo, Ethiopia, and Syria. Many of them settled in Kansas City less than a year ago.

Nan Goldin / The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

They’d been promised “gritty expression.”

But the two dozen members of The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art’s Society of Fellows who’d gathered at the southern tip of the Bloch Building did not appear in search of any such thing. Just past the end point of “The Big Picture,” the Nelson’s recently opened showcase of photos from the Hall Family Foundation, the smartly dressed patrons sipped wine and listened to cocktail jazz.

Segment 1: How does weather shape Kansas culture?

It's that time of year when tornado sirens ring out their eerie sound and crazy weather hits the plains. Inspired by a photography exhibit of Kansas tornado sirens, we explore how the weather affects our lives and communities.

Nelson Pereira

When two trained and industrious young artists, each exhibiting a set of arresting photos, understand themselves less as notable new photographers than as people with serious questions who happen to have cameras – just like everyone else with an iPhone and an Instagram – the message is a striking indication of where the form is headed now.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

A Sudanese woman gathered her six grandchildren to explain the family’s 1996 escape to Ethiopia from war-torn Sudan. The children had not yet been born when a bomb hit the village and the grandmother and her own children fled.

The family literally ran night after night, sleeping in bushes during the day to escape fighters’ notice. In 1997, they reached Ethiopia and settled in a refugee camp where they lived until immigrating to the United States a year ago. An international agency assigned them to Kansas City.

Pete Souza / Official White House Photo

Given the importance of the American presidency, it's no surprise photos of the commander-in-chief tend to become iconic. Today, veteran White House correspondent Kenneth T. Walsh explains what makes the White House photographer role so influential, and why he thinks Pres. Trump is missing an opportunity with his chief image-maker. Then, we hear from two leaders in the Missouri Statehouse, Democrat Rep.

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