politics | KCUR

politics

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Politics happen along party lines, and we mean that in more ways than one. Kansas Citians on the art of political fundraising. Specifically, the local fundraising parties that fill the coffers of national candidates.

Guests:

  • Sharon Hoffman, organizer for a variety of causes and candidates, including Obama's 2008 and 2012 Kansas City campaigns
  • Annie Presley, principle, McKellar Group

On Tuesday, voters in five states went to the polls to cast their vote for the presidential candidates. On this edition of Up To Date, we analyze the Missouri primary, which turned out to be the closest race of the night. 

Guests:

  • Peverill Squire is the Hicks and Martha Griffiths Chair in American Political Institutions at the University of Missouri.
  • Robynn Kuhlmann is an assistant professor of political science at the University of Central Missouri.

The right to vote was not in the original version of our Constitution, but the fight to vote has been with us since Revolutionary times. Hear how voter ID, suppressed voter turnout and other issues are not exclusive to the current day.

Guest:

  • Michael Waldman is president of the Brennan Center of Justice and the author of The Fight to Vote.

Abraham Lincoln is remembered for his skill as an orator, but the president also utilized other tools to better connect with voters. His use of photography, which was a cutting-edge technology in his day and age, helped him to victory in the tough 1860 election. 

Guest:

For many in the Kansas City area, the name Jeff Roe may ring a bell. Known as a “bad boy” of Missouri politics, Roe has been behind some of the most ruthless political campaigns in the past decade. Now, he takes on his biggest campaign yet — Ted Cruz's run for President.

Guest:

In one week, the hypothesizing and conjecturing will stop — at least for a moment as real voters express their preferences for the presidency at the Iowa Caucuses. On this edition of Up To Date, political experts David von Drehle and Carl Cannon talk with Steve Kraske about the 2016 presidential race.

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

For almost a year, presidential candidates have been crisscrossing Iowa, wooing voters in a state that relies on agriculture for about one-third of its economy. But even here, most voters live in cities or suburbs and don’t have a first-hand connection to the farm.

That makes it difficult to get candidates talking about food system issues from school lunches, to crop supports, to water quality. Yet these all fall under the federal agriculture department. If candidates aren’t talking about them in Iowa, it’s possible they’ll be left out of the campaigns entirely.

Ask anybody these days to name their state senator, their U.S. senator or member of Congress and chances are you’ll get a blank look more often than you’ll get a correct answer. On this edition of Up To Date, we discuss how to increase voter awareness and engagement.

Guests:

The St. Louis Board of Aldermen gave its blessing to a measure aimed at keeping the St. Louis Rams in town.

Now, it’s up to the NFL’s owners to see if this potentially expensive gambit paid off.

For those who position themselves firmly to the left, the challenges can be great. Call an Uber or hail a cab? Date a conservative? The Nation contributing editor Liza Featherstone tackles these issues in her wry advice column for liberals, 'Asking For A Friend.'

American composers have played a role in turning the political tables in our society. Dr. Anna Celenza speaks with Steve Kraske about how their compositions influenced people's hearts and minds.

Guests:

Chelsea Clinton has dedicated herself to inspiring young people to become involved. On this edition of Up To Date, she tells Steve Kraske about why she thinks the country's youth is ready to make change and about how lucky she feels to have grown up the daughter of a President and a Secretary of State. 

Former U.S. Senator John Danforth has spent years speaking out against the abuses of our political system. On this edition of Up To Date,  he speaks with Steve Kraske about Missouri, the 2016 presidential race and his latest book, The Relevance of Religion: How Faithful People Can Change Politics.

Audiofiles: Podcasts We Love — Fall 2015

Oct 20, 2015
Photo Credit: Sascha Kohlmann

Central Standard’s podcast connoisseurs take to the mic to share what podcasts deserve your time and attention. Here’s what they recommend:

 

Jeremy Bernfeld, editor of KCUR's Harvest Public Media

In politics, flip-flopping is code for untrustworthy. But human beings do change their minds. What are the pressures that cause shifts on issues while in office? And how can voters evaluate politicians' changes of heart?

Guests:

Generation Listen KC is an initiative from  KCUR to engage with young public radio listeners in the KC region. As part of its Forward Promote series, Generation Listen KC invited Up to Date's Steve Kraske to moderate a forum on civic engagement for millennials.

Kansas City comedian Brian Huther is only half surprised that the flag-dressed front-porch beer-drinking character he created has grown exponentially more famous over the last four days as the "Your Drunk Neighbor: Donald Trump" video went viral.

Former Missouri State Senator Jeff Smith was sent to prison for a year and a day for campaign election violations. He tells Steve Kraske what he learned about the criminal justice system during his incarceration. Smith's book recounting his time in a federal penitentiary is Mr. Smith Goes To Prison: What My Year Behind Bars Taught Me About America's Prison Crisis.

Shelf Life

Sep 11, 2015

Before Will Leathem opened Prospero's Books in Midtown, he was a Republican political consultant and a touring musician. On this Portrait Session show, Will talks about poetry, politics and the first book he published: 'Leavened 911, a compilation of stories and essays by Kansas Citians about the September 11 attacks.

Guest:

Senate-Bound

Aug 21, 2015

Blaine Stephens knew he was up against the odds when he applied for a U.S. Senate intern position. As the Plattsburg, Missouri, high-schooler packs his bags for Washington,  D.C. Up To Date caught up with him to learn how he made the cut. 

Guest:

  • Jason Rae served as a Senate page 10 years ago. He is currently a senior associate at Nation Consulting in Milwaukee. 

U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill has battled through a political world dominated by men to get where she is today. She talks about that journey in her memoir, Plenty Ladylike.

Senator McCaskill will speak at 2 p.m. Sunday, August 16 at Unity Temple on the Plaza. For admission information, visit www.rainydaybooks.com.

Simon & Schuster

It's been a long, strange trip for U.S. Senator Claire McCaskill.   

From homecoming queen to state auditor to two-term U.S. senator in one of the most competitive states in the country, the journey has been an uphill battle. 

McCaskill talks about navigating a political world dominated by men in her memoir, Plenty Ladylike

Here's an excerpt from the book, in which she describes the challenges she faced as a female lawyer in the Missouri House of Representatives:

Plenty Ladylike, by Claire McCaskill with Terry Ganey

Kansas Representative Gene Suellentrop is a supporter of the Kansas budget experiment known as the "march to zero" for income taxes. In his nephew's social circles, on the east coast, that position is hard to understand. So the nephew decided to immerse himself in his uncle's world, just as a legislative session turned upside-down by budget debates got underway.

Guests:

For a city of 9,500 people, Mission, Kansas has its share of big issues. Mayor Steve Schowengerdt discusses some of the meatiest topics on his city's table, from driveway taxes and the Mission Gateway development project to chickens and bees. 

Paul Andrews / paulandrewsphotography.com

Democrat Katheryn Shields, who will take her seat on Kansas City Council on Aug. 1 after a close election win, didn't grow up dreaming of political campaigns, though the Parkville farm where she grew up as an only girl with four older brothers did teach her to be "a bit of a scrapper." 

A 2013 poll showed that nearly a quarter of Americans lean toward a libertarian political philosophy. We explore libertarian ideals that support gay marriage as well as gun ownership. 

Guest:

In today's political world, winning a campaign often involves vilifying an opponent— at any cost. On this edition of Up To Date, we preview The Village Square's upcoming forum, "The Politics of Personal Destruction."

Guests: 

As the Kansas legislature nears an all-time record for longest session in Kansas history, Up To Date brings you the latest on the budget impasse and the threat of possible furloughs. 

Guests:

Courtesy Photo / Books by Ace

You may not know her name, but she’s brushed shoulders with Margaret Thatcher, worked on Wall Street, and shattered records raising money for George W. Bush’s first presidential campaign.

George Mitchell’s career in public service has been one of the most distinguished in recent times. After 15 years in the Senate, Mitchell’s work as a negotiator in Northern Ireland and the Middle East earned him the Presidential Medal of Freedom. 

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