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non-profits

Segment 1: Heavy caseloads and long hours are taking a toll on Missouri's public defenders.

Officials say public defenders in Kansas City, Missouri, are sometimes handling more than 100 cases at a time, and staffing and workload situations have been dire for years. We speak with leaders of the public defender's office to find out how those pressures are affecting attorneys' mental health and the ability of clients to get a fair trial.

Segment 1: Application numbers for growing medical marijuana in Missouri are below expectations

With only a few days left to submit the required paperwork, there are less than 100 applicants for the 60 cultivator licenses Missouri is ready to award. A panel of those involved in working to supply medical marijuana dispensaries by spring 2020 explain what goes into creating the state's regulations and what hopeful cultivators have already done to be considered.

Christina Elias / KCUR 89.3

Presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg said the Kansas City-based Veterans Community Project is “deeply impressive” during a campaign visit Wednesday morning. The nonprofit offers a range of veteran services, including temporary housing assistance.

“I’m going to be sharing this story everywhere I go,” he said after touring the VCP Village, where homeless veterans can live temporarily in a “tiny house.”

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

"Mentoring should be transformational," says Henry Wash, "like a metamorphosis."

It certainly has been for Wash, who runs the nonprofit High Aspirations, a mentorship program that focuses on African American males between 8 and 18 years of age.

Wash has benefitted from two of Kansas City's most generous mentors, who passed down lessons he still uses in his work.

Segment 1: Kansas City urban core program fills vital role of mentorship.

Kansas City's Henry Wash gives much credit to his mentor Henry Bloch for seeing him as a social entrepreneur and inspiring his nonprofit organization High Aspirations. Wash discussed the significant problems black boys face, the importance of them having consistent guidance, and the opening of his new facility. 

Focus Features

Segment 1: River of Refuge is a nonprofit organization that helps transition homeless families into permanent housing.

Erica Hunzinger / Harvest Public Media

As the 2018 harvest wrapped up and the leaves turned brilliant shades of red and yellow, two of the world’s biggest agribusinesses, Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) and Smithfield Foods, announced they were pairing up on projects with environmental nonprofits.

It didn’t create the furor like in past years when oil companies joined forces with nonprofits and were met by accusations of “greenwashing” — that is, just trying to shine up their reputations. But that doesn’t mean these latest partnerships have it figured out. 

Segment 1: Jason Sudeikis brings it for his friends.

Jason Sudeikis returns to his hometown for Thundergong, with a star-studded lineup of comedy and music. The proceeds go towards a local non-profit founded by a childhood friend who lost a leg unexpectedly in 2005; his foundation now supports others who need prosthetic limbs. The two friends talk about everything from yacht rock to the scourge of indecency.  

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Why voting to retain (or not retain) judges matters.

The confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court, and the shift to a more conservative court, has shown that persons picked to serve on the bench matter. This holds true at the state level too. But unlike the federal courts, judges who serve in the Kansas or Missouri state courts are required to stand for retention. That means you decide if they keep their jobs. Today, we got advice on informing yourself and voting responsibly in these oft-overlooked elections.

The Mission Continues

Segment 1: After a year of controversy, how is the former governor's nonprofit bouncing back?

Before he was Missouri's governor, Eric Greitens founded The Mission Continues to help veterans reintegrate in and improve the communities where they lived. After he became governor and was accused of using the nonprofit's donor list to raise campaign funds, the charity came under intense scrutiny. Now that the dust is starting to settle, we spoke with the organization's leader and a volunteer to see how the group is moving beyond the scandal.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Non-profit connects underserved Kansas City neighborhoods to fresh produce.

Food deserts are a big problem for many communities in the metro, but the remedy isn't always to build big grocery stores. Today, we talked with the founder of Kanbe's Markets to learn about his unique approach to connecting communities with fresh, healthy food.

Paul Andrews / http://paulandrewsphotography.com/

Enrique Chi, frontman of the Kansas City-based band Making Movies, has had a busy year.

The band released its second album, “I Am Another You,” last spring. Produced by Steve Berlin of Los Lobos, the record made it to #3 on Billboard's Latin Album chart.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Work hard and you’ll be successful, is how the old adage of the American Dream goes.

But the members of one Kansas City organization are adding their voices to a national movement arguing that’s not really the case, and they're emerging from some of America's lowest-paying industries to do it.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

The challenges of life in poverty are diverse, and can be hard to grasp for people who haven't lived it themselves. Today, we learn how future health care professionals are using poverty simulations to get a new perspective on what their poorest patients face daily.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

It's the holiday season once again, when many of us look to donate some time to a worthwhile cause. Today, we ask representatives of local non-profits what makes a great seasonal or year-round volunteer, and how you can have the most impact when you give back to the community. Then, learn about a debate that has been raging since the 1940s — what is the better winter holiday snack; the latke or the hamantash? It may sound like apples and oranges, but the Hanukkah potato pancake and the Purim stuffed cookie square off year after year to help debaters hone their craft.

Scraps KC Executive Director Brenda Mott with Cracker, a homeless volunteer.
Tom Taylor / KCUR 89.3

Scraps KC is a place to let go of your unwanted materials, inspire creativity and a refuge for the homeless from the streets.

Down in Kansas City's West Bottoms, Scraps has been open for 13 months. Executive Director Brenda Mott calls it a creative reuse center. It's like a thrift store targeted at crafters.

Gary White
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

In a world where 884 million people don’t have access to water and 2.2 billion people don’t have sanitary toilet facilities, ending the global water crisis seems like a lofty goal.

But Gary White—whose nonprofit organizations have so far reached 7 million people—believes providing access to safe water and sanitation for all people can be achieved in his lifetime.

Ken Doll / Kansas Center for Economic Growth

The Sunflower State's budget is a mess and lawmakers in Topeka are struggling to solve the state's fiscal woes. Today, a former budget director evaluates the precarious situation. Also, we speak with novelist Ellen Hopkins, who experienced the kidnapping of one daughter and the drug addiction of another.

Dan Margolies / KCUR

A couple of years ago, 41-year-old Shine Adams, a recovering alcoholic, started a small nonprofit in Lawrence to help people down on their luck.

Before then he’d been making electric guitars out of cedar wood in his basement and had some cedar scraps lying around. That gave him an idea.

“People would come over to my house and could smell the cedar from the basement and they would always compliment me on it and love the way it smells,” he says.

When President Dwight Eisenhower started People to People International, he envisioned everyday people from around the world coming together to form friendships that could bridge cultures and discourage conflict. Sixty years later, Ike's granddaughter Mary Jean Eisenhower, now CEO of the organization, continues to advance that ideal.

Ariana Brocious / NET News

Ord, Nebraska, with its population of 2,000, sits between corn fields and ranches on the North Loup River, in the middle of the state.

Downtown, its historic art deco theater boasts high ceilings, multicolor arches, and inlaid wooden decorations in the lobby, walls tiled in red and navy, and hexagonal lights. The building on Ord’s central square served as a movie theater for decades, but in 2011, it underwent extensive renovations to become a live performance space.

H2O

Jul 14, 2016

Kansas City might be an unusual place to headquarter an international organization that helps bring clean water to people around the world. A chat with Gary White, KC native and co-founder of Water.org.

Guest:

  

Attitudes about hospice and palliative care have changed dramatically over the last 40 years, and the number of patients who receive this type of treatment has expanded. Two longtime leaders in the field, though, acknowledge that more work is needed to ease the pain and suffering of the most ailing patients.

Guests:

Two sham cancer charities that allegedly scammed nearly $76 million from consumers will be dissolved, their president banned from charity fundraising and their assets liquidated in a settlement announced today with all 50 states, the District of Columbia and the Federal Trade Commission.

A majority of American veterans, both able-bodied and wounded, say they want to continue to serve after fighting overseas. TIME Magazine’s Joe Klein details the story behind two soldiers who show fellow veterans how to use their war skills to rebuild communities here and abroad in his new book, Charlie Mike.

Charitable giving in the United States rose for the fifth consecutive year in 2014 and now exceeds $358 billion. Many individuals and organizations are choosing to contribute through donor-advised funds. We learn more about this trend, and how it affects nonprofit organizations and charities. 

Guests:

Wikipedia / KCUR

On September 15, members of the Tiny House Collective KC, a non-profit that supports people building homes of less than 1,000 square feet, became concerned for their friend and colleague Joshua Farmer.

Natasha Kirsch
Julie Denesha / / KCUR

Natasha Kirsch was volunteering at an alcoholic and addict recovery home when the idea—and a well-timed phone call — came to her.

Sitting in the business office, Kirsch said, it would not be unusual for eight to 10 women to be sitting on the couch outside, asking for help finding and getting a job. They needed the income and the stability — many had several kids and few resources.

But there was a problem: Most were high school dropouts with low reading levels, many had felonies on their records. What job skills could they market? And who would hire them? 

Giving Ex-Cons A Chance In The Workplace

Sep 22, 2015

Getting a job can be tough--even impossible-- when you've been in prison. On this edition of Up to Date, we talk with a Lawrence man who started the non-profit Sun Cedar specifically to give these people a fresh start in the workplace.

Guest:

  • Shine Adams, founder of Sun Cedar 

Officials with Guadalupe Centers, Inc. are lining up inspections and applications with an eye to converting the 19-acre St Paul School of Theology from an historic Baptist seminary to an elementary school, summer program and possibly even a credit union.

Guadalupe Centers, Inc. CEO Cris Medina says their increasingly popular charter schools and other services don’t just serve Hispanics, but also Somalis, Sudanese and South East Asians. Many of those who take advantage of their services, he says, live on the east side of town.

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